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Social media during multi-hazard disasters: Lessons from the Kaikoura Earthquake 2016

Social media during multi-hazard disasters: Lessons from the Kaikoura Earthquake 2016
Social media during multi-hazard disasters: Lessons from the Kaikoura Earthquake 2016
Social media provide channels of communication during emergency events such as earthquakes. Such sites may be utilised for a range of emergency response strategies providing that data is processed rapidly and management strategies employed effectively. The processing of social media data presents many challenges for emergency responders: information overload, organisational communication and information reliability remain prevalent issues. Furthermore, there is a growing need to improve the management of multi-hazard disasters (sometimes referred to as “cascading disasters”) due to an increase in their frequency and severity, exacerbated by underlying global problems such as climate change. This is especially important to geographical regions that are prone to particular hazards - New Zealand for instance recorded nearly 33,000 earthquakes in 2016 alone. Similarly, there is an increasing need to evaluate developments in technology and social media sites themselves as they are progressively being relied upon during emergency events. In this study, we examine the crisis communications of the Kaikoura earthquake (New Zealand, 2016) using mainstream media content such as new stories, and online content such as Twitter data. A mixed method approach was employed which combined content analysis with the application of a conceptual framework. The paper then presents (i.) an analysis of crisis communications during the event, focusing on changes in media content and theme, (ii.) the structure of online emergency response in the country and its affect on management, and (iii.) the barriers effecting emergency response in this case study.
Social Media, Multi-Hazard Disaster, Disaster Management, Earthquake, Emergency Response
Gray, Briony
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Weal, Mark J.
e8fd30a6-c060-41c5-b388-ca52c81032a4
Martin, David
e5c52473-e9f0-4f09-b64c-fa32194b162f
Gray, Briony
b2dfca6f-f16b-45ba-bd84-9a6ca17faa1f
Weal, Mark J.
e8fd30a6-c060-41c5-b388-ca52c81032a4
Martin, David
e5c52473-e9f0-4f09-b64c-fa32194b162f

Gray, Briony, Weal, Mark J. and Martin, David (2017) Social media during multi-hazard disasters: Lessons from the Kaikoura Earthquake 2016. Disaster Management 2017: 5th International Conference on Disaster Management and Human Health: Reducing Risk, Improving Outcomes, Seville, Spain. 07 - 09 Jun 2017. 11 pp .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Social media provide channels of communication during emergency events such as earthquakes. Such sites may be utilised for a range of emergency response strategies providing that data is processed rapidly and management strategies employed effectively. The processing of social media data presents many challenges for emergency responders: information overload, organisational communication and information reliability remain prevalent issues. Furthermore, there is a growing need to improve the management of multi-hazard disasters (sometimes referred to as “cascading disasters”) due to an increase in their frequency and severity, exacerbated by underlying global problems such as climate change. This is especially important to geographical regions that are prone to particular hazards - New Zealand for instance recorded nearly 33,000 earthquakes in 2016 alone. Similarly, there is an increasing need to evaluate developments in technology and social media sites themselves as they are progressively being relied upon during emergency events. In this study, we examine the crisis communications of the Kaikoura earthquake (New Zealand, 2016) using mainstream media content such as new stories, and online content such as Twitter data. A mixed method approach was employed which combined content analysis with the application of a conceptual framework. The paper then presents (i.) an analysis of crisis communications during the event, focusing on changes in media content and theme, (ii.) the structure of online emergency response in the country and its affect on management, and (iii.) the barriers effecting emergency response in this case study.

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More information

Published date: 2017
Venue - Dates: Disaster Management 2017: 5th International Conference on Disaster Management and Human Health: Reducing Risk, Improving Outcomes, Seville, Spain, 2017-06-07 - 2017-06-09
Keywords: Social Media, Multi-Hazard Disaster, Disaster Management, Earthquake, Emergency Response

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 412375
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/412375
PURE UUID: 93bbaa02-ddd5-4315-8950-82f3fb8864d9
ORCID for Mark J. Weal: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6251-8786
ORCID for David Martin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0397-0769

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 17 Jul 2017 13:33
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 01:21

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