The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Rapid response to climate change in a marginal sea

Rapid response to climate change in a marginal sea
Rapid response to climate change in a marginal sea
The Mediterranean Sea is a mid-latitude marginal sea, particularly responsive to climate change as reported by recent studies. The Sicily Channel is a choke point separating the sea in two main basins, the Eastern Mediterranean Sea and the Western Mediterranean Sea. Here, we report and analyse a long-term record (1993–2016) of the thermohaline properties of the Intermediate Water that crosses the Sicily Channel, showing increasing temperature and salinity trends much stronger than those observed at intermediate depths in the global ocean. We investigate the causes of the observed trends and in particular determine the role of a changing climate over the Eastern Mediterranean, where the Intermediate Water is formed. The long-term Sicily record reveals how fast the response to climate change can be in a marginal sea like the Mediterranean Sea compared to the global ocean, and demonstrates the essential role of long time series in the ocean.
2045-2322
Schroeder, K.
3a18c5cf-33b3-40c7-8aa7-f7dcbe452259
Chiggiato, J.
cb0334e2-c0f0-4ae4-906c-2918531cbf62
Josey, S. A.
2252ab7f-5cd2-49fd-a951-aece44553d93
Borghini, M.
0f6941c2-3e51-4af9-ae71-b352ae1930f0
Aracri, Simona
8b7db622-145a-414f-b107-0be28ba282e3
Sparnocchia, S.
f4646ae2-f2f7-42c2-9c35-fe6c609790ef
Schroeder, K.
3a18c5cf-33b3-40c7-8aa7-f7dcbe452259
Chiggiato, J.
cb0334e2-c0f0-4ae4-906c-2918531cbf62
Josey, S. A.
2252ab7f-5cd2-49fd-a951-aece44553d93
Borghini, M.
0f6941c2-3e51-4af9-ae71-b352ae1930f0
Aracri, Simona
8b7db622-145a-414f-b107-0be28ba282e3
Sparnocchia, S.
f4646ae2-f2f7-42c2-9c35-fe6c609790ef

Schroeder, K., Chiggiato, J., Josey, S. A., Borghini, M., Aracri, Simona and Sparnocchia, S. (2017) Rapid response to climate change in a marginal sea. Scientific Reports, 7 (1), [4065]. (doi:10.1038/s41598-017-04455-5).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The Mediterranean Sea is a mid-latitude marginal sea, particularly responsive to climate change as reported by recent studies. The Sicily Channel is a choke point separating the sea in two main basins, the Eastern Mediterranean Sea and the Western Mediterranean Sea. Here, we report and analyse a long-term record (1993–2016) of the thermohaline properties of the Intermediate Water that crosses the Sicily Channel, showing increasing temperature and salinity trends much stronger than those observed at intermediate depths in the global ocean. We investigate the causes of the observed trends and in particular determine the role of a changing climate over the Eastern Mediterranean, where the Intermediate Water is formed. The long-term Sicily record reveals how fast the response to climate change can be in a marginal sea like the Mediterranean Sea compared to the global ocean, and demonstrates the essential role of long time series in the ocean.

Text
SciRep_Schroeder - Version of Record
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (3MB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 18 May 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 22 June 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 412523
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/412523
ISSN: 2045-2322
PURE UUID: 8fbb3235-d4bd-404f-8592-a920955667c8

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 20 Jul 2017 16:30
Last modified: 27 Apr 2022 04:22

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: K. Schroeder
Author: J. Chiggiato
Author: S. A. Josey
Author: M. Borghini
Author: Simona Aracri
Author: S. Sparnocchia

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×