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Effect of room temperature on tests for diagnosing vibration-induced white finger: finger rewarming times and finger systolic blood pressures

Effect of room temperature on tests for diagnosing vibration-induced white finger: finger rewarming times and finger systolic blood pressures
Effect of room temperature on tests for diagnosing vibration-induced white finger: finger rewarming times and finger systolic blood pressures
Purpose: This study investigates the effects of room temperature on two standard tests used to assist the diagnosis of vibration-induced white finger (VWF): finger rewarming times and finger systolic blood pressures.
Methods: Twelve healthy males and twelve healthy females participated in four sessions to obtain either finger skin temperatures (FSTs) during cooling and rewarming of the hand or finger systolic blood pressures (FSBPs) after local cooling of the fingers to 15°C and 10°C. The measures were obtained with the room temperature at either 20 or 28°C.
Results: There were lower baseline finger skin temperatures, longer finger rewarming times, and lower finger systolic blood pressures with the room temperature at 20°C than 28°C. However, percentage reductions in FSBP at 15°C and 10°C relative to 30°C (i.e., %FSBP) did not differ between the two room temperatures. Females had lower baseline FSTs, longer rewarming times, and lower FSBPs than males, but %FSBPs were similar in males and females.
Conclusions: Finger rewarming times after cold provocation are heavily influenced by room temperature and gender. For evaluating peripheral circulatory function using finger rewarming times, the room temperature must be strictly controlled, and a different diagnostic criterion is required for females. The calculation of percentage changes in finger systolic blood pressure at 15°C and 10°C relative to 30°C reduces effects of both room temperature and gender, and the test may be used in conditions where the ±1°C tolerance on room temperature required by the current standard cannot be achieved.
0340-0131
527-538
Ye, Ying
5cfc9fff-c24f-4e7c-8a97-c78436d79966
Griffin, Michael J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8
Ye, Ying
5cfc9fff-c24f-4e7c-8a97-c78436d79966
Griffin, Michael J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8

Ye, Ying and Griffin, Michael J. (2017) Effect of room temperature on tests for diagnosing vibration-induced white finger: finger rewarming times and finger systolic blood pressures. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 90 (6), 527-538. (doi:10.1007/s00420-017-1214-2).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Purpose: This study investigates the effects of room temperature on two standard tests used to assist the diagnosis of vibration-induced white finger (VWF): finger rewarming times and finger systolic blood pressures.
Methods: Twelve healthy males and twelve healthy females participated in four sessions to obtain either finger skin temperatures (FSTs) during cooling and rewarming of the hand or finger systolic blood pressures (FSBPs) after local cooling of the fingers to 15°C and 10°C. The measures were obtained with the room temperature at either 20 or 28°C.
Results: There were lower baseline finger skin temperatures, longer finger rewarming times, and lower finger systolic blood pressures with the room temperature at 20°C than 28°C. However, percentage reductions in FSBP at 15°C and 10°C relative to 30°C (i.e., %FSBP) did not differ between the two room temperatures. Females had lower baseline FSTs, longer rewarming times, and lower FSBPs than males, but %FSBPs were similar in males and females.
Conclusions: Finger rewarming times after cold provocation are heavily influenced by room temperature and gender. For evaluating peripheral circulatory function using finger rewarming times, the room temperature must be strictly controlled, and a different diagnostic criterion is required for females. The calculation of percentage changes in finger systolic blood pressure at 15°C and 10°C relative to 30°C reduces effects of both room temperature and gender, and the test may be used in conditions where the ±1°C tolerance on room temperature required by the current standard cannot be achieved.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 3 March 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 28 March 2017
Published date: August 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 412587
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/412587
ISSN: 0340-0131
PURE UUID: 1e86ff55-1b04-48a7-95d2-858ea296641b
ORCID for Michael J. Griffin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0743-9502

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Date deposited: 24 Jul 2017 16:31
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 04:59

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