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The effect of systemic inflammation on human brain barrier function

The effect of systemic inflammation on human brain barrier function
The effect of systemic inflammation on human brain barrier function
The blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays an important role in the clinical expression of neuropsychiatric symptoms during systemic illness in health and neurological disease. Evidence from in vitro and preclinical in vivo studies indicate that systemic inflammation impairs blood-brain barrier function. In order to investigate this hypothesis, we evaluated the association between systemic inflammatory markers (leucocytes, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein) and BBB function (cerebrospinal fluid/serum albumin ratio) in 1273 consecutive lumbar punctures. In the absence of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) abnormality, systemic inflammation did not affect the CSF/serum albumin ratio. When CSF abnormality was present, systemic inflammation significantly predicted the CSF/serum albumin ratio. Amongst the systemic inflammatory markers, C-reactive protein was the predominant driver of this effect. Temporal analysis in this association study suggested causality. In conclusion, the diseased BBB has an increased susceptibility to systemic inflammation.
0889-1591
35-40
Elwood, Elliot
782a9903-2086-42d2-b406-205f7d8fae56
Lim, Zhi
27a5490b-fd4f-4c89-a8fa-55c26760236d
Naveed, Hammad
35ae4cf9-81c3-47a4-bb6d-32461a41aca6
Galea, Ian
66209a2f-f7e6-4d63-afe4-e9299f156f0b
Elwood, Elliot
782a9903-2086-42d2-b406-205f7d8fae56
Lim, Zhi
27a5490b-fd4f-4c89-a8fa-55c26760236d
Naveed, Hammad
35ae4cf9-81c3-47a4-bb6d-32461a41aca6
Galea, Ian
66209a2f-f7e6-4d63-afe4-e9299f156f0b

Elwood, Elliot, Lim, Zhi, Naveed, Hammad and Galea, Ian (2017) The effect of systemic inflammation on human brain barrier function. Brain, Behavior and Immunity, 62, 35-40. (doi:10.1016/j.bbi.2016.10.020).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays an important role in the clinical expression of neuropsychiatric symptoms during systemic illness in health and neurological disease. Evidence from in vitro and preclinical in vivo studies indicate that systemic inflammation impairs blood-brain barrier function. In order to investigate this hypothesis, we evaluated the association between systemic inflammatory markers (leucocytes, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein) and BBB function (cerebrospinal fluid/serum albumin ratio) in 1273 consecutive lumbar punctures. In the absence of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) abnormality, systemic inflammation did not affect the CSF/serum albumin ratio. When CSF abnormality was present, systemic inflammation significantly predicted the CSF/serum albumin ratio. Amongst the systemic inflammatory markers, C-reactive protein was the predominant driver of this effect. Temporal analysis in this association study suggested causality. In conclusion, the diseased BBB has an increased susceptibility to systemic inflammation.

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Accepted/In Press date: 30 October 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 1 November 2016
Published date: May 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 412758
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/412758
ISSN: 0889-1591
PURE UUID: 43c555e6-bfb6-4dca-a697-db614148f8be
ORCID for Ian Galea: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1268-5102

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Date deposited: 01 Aug 2017 16:31
Last modified: 10 Dec 2019 01:46

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Contributors

Author: Elliot Elwood
Author: Zhi Lim
Author: Hammad Naveed
Author: Ian Galea ORCID iD

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