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Are urban-canopy velocity profiles exponential?

Are urban-canopy velocity profiles exponential?
Are urban-canopy velocity profiles exponential?
Using analyses of data from extant direct numerical simulations and large-eddy simulations of boundary-layer and channel flows over and within urban-type canopies, sectional drag forces, Reynolds and dispersive shear stresses are examined for a range of roughness densities. Using the spatially-averaged mean velocity profiles these quantities allow deduction of the canopy mixing length and sectional drag coefficient. It is shown that the common assumptions about the behaviour of these quantities, needed to produce an analytical model for the canopy velocity profile, are usually invalid, in contrast to what is found in typical vegetative (e.g. forest) canopies. The consequence is that an exponential shape of the spatially-averaged mean velocity profile within the canopy cannot normally be expected, as indeed the data demonstrate. Nonetheless, recent canopy models that allow prediction of the roughness length appropriate for the inertial layer’s logarithmic profile above the canopy do not seem to depend crucially on their (invalid) assumption of an exponential profile within the canopy.
0006-8314
Castro, Ian
66e6330d-d93a-439a-a69b-e061e660de61
Castro, Ian
66e6330d-d93a-439a-a69b-e061e660de61

Castro, Ian (2017) Are urban-canopy velocity profiles exponential? Boundary-Layer Meteorology. (doi:10.1007/s10546-017-0258-x).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Using analyses of data from extant direct numerical simulations and large-eddy simulations of boundary-layer and channel flows over and within urban-type canopies, sectional drag forces, Reynolds and dispersive shear stresses are examined for a range of roughness densities. Using the spatially-averaged mean velocity profiles these quantities allow deduction of the canopy mixing length and sectional drag coefficient. It is shown that the common assumptions about the behaviour of these quantities, needed to produce an analytical model for the canopy velocity profile, are usually invalid, in contrast to what is found in typical vegetative (e.g. forest) canopies. The consequence is that an exponential shape of the spatially-averaged mean velocity profile within the canopy cannot normally be expected, as indeed the data demonstrate. Nonetheless, recent canopy models that allow prediction of the roughness length appropriate for the inertial layer’s logarithmic profile above the canopy do not seem to depend crucially on their (invalid) assumption of an exponential profile within the canopy.

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Accepted/In Press date: 26 April 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 8 June 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 412857
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/412857
ISSN: 0006-8314
PURE UUID: fddd56a3-e87f-41f0-b40a-a619c3b87ac5

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Date deposited: 03 Aug 2017 16:30
Last modified: 16 Jul 2019 18:01

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