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New potentiometric wireless chloride sensors provide high resolution information on chemical transport processes in streams

New potentiometric wireless chloride sensors provide high resolution information on chemical transport processes in streams
New potentiometric wireless chloride sensors provide high resolution information on chemical transport processes in streams
Quantifying the travel times, pathways, and dispersion of solutes moving through stream environments is critical for understanding the biogeochemical cycling processes that control ecosystem functioning. Validation of stream solute transport and exchange process models requires data obtained from in-stream measurement of chemical concentration changes through time. This can be expensive and time consuming, leading to a need for cheap distributed sensor arrays that respond instantly and record chemical transport at points of interest on timescales of seconds. To meet this need we apply new, low-cost (in the order of a euro per sensor) potentiometric chloride sensors used in a distributed array to obtain data with high spatial and temporal resolution. The application here is to monitoring in-stream hydrodynamic transport and dispersive mixing of an injected chemical, in this case NaCl. We present data obtained from the distributed sensor array under baseflow conditions for stream reaches in Luxembourg and Western Australia. The reaches were selected to provide a range of increasingly complex in-channel flow patterns. Mid-channel sensor results are comparable to data obtained from more expensive electrical conductivity meters, but simultaneous acquisition of tracer data at several positions across the channel allows far greater spatial resolution of hydrodynamic mixing processes and identification of chemical ‘dead zones’ in the study reaches.
2073-4441
Smettem, Keith
e9312ec8-9ed5-43a4-89c2-6abbecaa48f2
Klaus, Julian
578253fe-3ac0-46a6-8ac2-1c070566c0e8
Harris, Nick
237cfdbd-86e4-4025-869c-c85136f14dfd
Pfister, Laurent
ee5d7508-3402-4753-be8d-cbba2ce098ff
Smettem, Keith
e9312ec8-9ed5-43a4-89c2-6abbecaa48f2
Klaus, Julian
578253fe-3ac0-46a6-8ac2-1c070566c0e8
Harris, Nick
237cfdbd-86e4-4025-869c-c85136f14dfd
Pfister, Laurent
ee5d7508-3402-4753-be8d-cbba2ce098ff

Smettem, Keith, Klaus, Julian, Harris, Nick and Pfister, Laurent (2017) New potentiometric wireless chloride sensors provide high resolution information on chemical transport processes in streams. Water, 9 (7), [542]. (doi:10.3390/w9070542).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Quantifying the travel times, pathways, and dispersion of solutes moving through stream environments is critical for understanding the biogeochemical cycling processes that control ecosystem functioning. Validation of stream solute transport and exchange process models requires data obtained from in-stream measurement of chemical concentration changes through time. This can be expensive and time consuming, leading to a need for cheap distributed sensor arrays that respond instantly and record chemical transport at points of interest on timescales of seconds. To meet this need we apply new, low-cost (in the order of a euro per sensor) potentiometric chloride sensors used in a distributed array to obtain data with high spatial and temporal resolution. The application here is to monitoring in-stream hydrodynamic transport and dispersive mixing of an injected chemical, in this case NaCl. We present data obtained from the distributed sensor array under baseflow conditions for stream reaches in Luxembourg and Western Australia. The reaches were selected to provide a range of increasingly complex in-channel flow patterns. Mid-channel sensor results are comparable to data obtained from more expensive electrical conductivity meters, but simultaneous acquisition of tracer data at several positions across the channel allows far greater spatial resolution of hydrodynamic mixing processes and identification of chemical ‘dead zones’ in the study reaches.

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water-202328 - Accepted Manuscript
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water-09-00542-v2 - Version of Record
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 15 July 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 19 July 2017
Published date: July 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 412886
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/412886
ISSN: 2073-4441
PURE UUID: cfae2d67-05f7-4454-8dfb-87003f1f1e8b
ORCID for Nick Harris: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4122-2219

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 07 Aug 2017 13:43
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 04:07

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