The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

How do people with long-term mental health problems negotiate relationships with network members at times of crisis?

How do people with long-term mental health problems negotiate relationships with network members at times of crisis?
How do people with long-term mental health problems negotiate relationships with network members at times of crisis?
A network perspective offers the opportunity to address the latent assets and resources which may be available to people in need of condition management and support1. Support from social networks has been shown to make a contribution to improved health outcomes for people with Long Term Conditions (LTC) and in the genesis of Mental Health (MH) problems and utilisation of services 2,3 . Exploring the role and function of social ties is relevant for understanding the support and resources that are leveraged in the
trajectories of those experiencing MH problems in everyday life recovery and in times of crises. Previous research suggests that one response to crisis is to identify those most able to provide support from a larger
group (selective activation) with the consequence that those able to secure ‘adequate’ network resources
seemingly report better outcomes than those who ‘injudiciously’ select network ties2. A ‘social safety net’, comprising community organisations and health-related network ties has the potential to reduce the
utilisation of MH services4 by providing emotional and direct alternative support for self-management activity. People, animals and material objects are key to providing support and linking people to needed resources in a person’s personal network. For example, online peer support has been found to provide
benefits through social connectedness, feelings of group belonging and the sharing of strategies and narrative for coping with the challenges of living life with a MH problem5. Diverse networks (including
strong and weak ties) may be better placed (compared to more restricted network types) to support LTC management, because of the availability of increased opportunities for negotiating relationships with
network members and resources1. Connections to and interaction with objects, places, pets and activities are also likely to be relevant to understanding the crises and recovery ‘work’ of those with a MH problem6.
However, relatively little is understood about the way in which network members provide support and resources for management and the difference in network support requirements at different times (eg in times of crisis versus recovery). Here, we utilise network mapping as an heuristic device to explore
people’s personal networks to examine the support available to manage MH and explore relationships with different network members at times of crisis.
Crisis represents a negative event in life. However it can also be an opportunity for growth7. For the purposes of this study, crisis is defined as the point at which mental distress becomes overwhelming or unmanageable
to the extent that the experience of it disrupts everyday life. It is a multifaceted process which can be understood as a trajectory that can be recognisable but is not necessarily linear
1369-6513
Walker, Sandra
a8b77bf5-02c1-4978-9d79-56a37813103b
Kennedy, Anne
e059c1c7-d6d0-41c8-95e1-95e5273b07f8
Vassilev, Ivaylo
d76a5531-4ddc-4eb2-909b-a2a1068f05f3
Rogers, Anne
105eeebc-1899-4850-950e-385a51738eb7
Walker, Sandra
a8b77bf5-02c1-4978-9d79-56a37813103b
Kennedy, Anne
e059c1c7-d6d0-41c8-95e1-95e5273b07f8
Vassilev, Ivaylo
d76a5531-4ddc-4eb2-909b-a2a1068f05f3
Rogers, Anne
105eeebc-1899-4850-950e-385a51738eb7

Walker, Sandra, Kennedy, Anne, Vassilev, Ivaylo and Rogers, Anne (2017) How do people with long-term mental health problems negotiate relationships with network members at times of crisis? Health Expectations. (doi:10.1111/hex.12620).

Record type: Article

Abstract

A network perspective offers the opportunity to address the latent assets and resources which may be available to people in need of condition management and support1. Support from social networks has been shown to make a contribution to improved health outcomes for people with Long Term Conditions (LTC) and in the genesis of Mental Health (MH) problems and utilisation of services 2,3 . Exploring the role and function of social ties is relevant for understanding the support and resources that are leveraged in the
trajectories of those experiencing MH problems in everyday life recovery and in times of crises. Previous research suggests that one response to crisis is to identify those most able to provide support from a larger
group (selective activation) with the consequence that those able to secure ‘adequate’ network resources
seemingly report better outcomes than those who ‘injudiciously’ select network ties2. A ‘social safety net’, comprising community organisations and health-related network ties has the potential to reduce the
utilisation of MH services4 by providing emotional and direct alternative support for self-management activity. People, animals and material objects are key to providing support and linking people to needed resources in a person’s personal network. For example, online peer support has been found to provide
benefits through social connectedness, feelings of group belonging and the sharing of strategies and narrative for coping with the challenges of living life with a MH problem5. Diverse networks (including
strong and weak ties) may be better placed (compared to more restricted network types) to support LTC management, because of the availability of increased opportunities for negotiating relationships with
network members and resources1. Connections to and interaction with objects, places, pets and activities are also likely to be relevant to understanding the crises and recovery ‘work’ of those with a MH problem6.
However, relatively little is understood about the way in which network members provide support and resources for management and the difference in network support requirements at different times (eg in times of crisis versus recovery). Here, we utilise network mapping as an heuristic device to explore
people’s personal networks to examine the support available to manage MH and explore relationships with different network members at times of crisis.
Crisis represents a negative event in life. However it can also be an opportunity for growth7. For the purposes of this study, crisis is defined as the point at which mental distress becomes overwhelming or unmanageable
to the extent that the experience of it disrupts everyday life. It is a multifaceted process which can be understood as a trajectory that can be recognisable but is not necessarily linear

Text
How do people with long-term mental health problems FOR PEER REVIEW - Author's Original
Restricted to Registered users only
Download (703kB)
Request a copy
Text
How do people with long-term mental health problems ACCEPTED FINAL - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Registered users only
Download (712kB)
Request a copy
Text
Walker_et_al-2017-Health_Expectations - Version of Record
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (315kB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 8 August 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 10 October 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 412974
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/412974
ISSN: 1369-6513
PURE UUID: cc32ced4-fa4b-47ae-85ba-5170c7b67975
ORCID for Sandra Walker: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1826-1201
ORCID for Anne Kennedy: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4570-9104

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 10 Aug 2017 16:30
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 00:49

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Sandra Walker ORCID iD
Author: Anne Kennedy ORCID iD
Author: Ivaylo Vassilev
Author: Anne Rogers

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×