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Trends in the recovery of phosphorus in bioavailable forms from wastewater

Trends in the recovery of phosphorus in bioavailable forms from wastewater
Trends in the recovery of phosphorus in bioavailable forms from wastewater
Addressing food security issues arising from phosphorus (P) scarcity is described as one of the greatest global challenges of the 21st Century. Dependence on inorganic phosphate fertilisers derived from limited geological sources of P creates an urgent need to recover P from wastes and treated waters, in safe forms that are also effective agriculturally – the established process of P removal by chemical precipitation using Fe or Al salts, is effective for P removal but leads to residues with limited bioavailability and contamination concerns. One of the greatest opportunities for P recovery is at wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) where the crystallisation of struvite and Ca-P from enhanced biological P removal (EBPR) sludge is well developed and already shown to be economically and operationally feasible in some WWTPs. However, recovery through this approach can be limited to <25% efficiency unless chemical extraction is applied. Thermochemical treatment of sludge ash produces detoxified residues that are currently utilised by the fertiliser industry; wet chemical extraction can be economically feasible in recovering P and other by-products. The bioavailability of recovered P depends on soil pH as well as the P-rich material in question. Struvite is a superior recovered P product in terms of plant availability, while use of Ca-P and thermochemically treated sewage sludge ash is limited to acidic soils. These technologies, in addition to others less developed, will be commercially pushed forward by revised fertiliser legislation and foreseeable legislative limits for WWTPs to achieve discharges of <1 mg P/L.
0045-6535
381-395
Melia, Patrick M.
be45abd6-6cb7-40c5-b0fe-6c74b5b9cc24
Cundy, Andrew B.
994fdc96-2dce-40f4-b74b-dc638286eb08
Sohi, Saran P.
a595774e-b59d-4aa2-b556-1c698361d000
Hooda, Peter S.
e0e628c5-d7dd-49b1-9bd7-3b4e96c78e91
Busquets, Rosa
d3f8511d-c34e-4bf7-956c-19e4c1c5949f
Melia, Patrick M.
be45abd6-6cb7-40c5-b0fe-6c74b5b9cc24
Cundy, Andrew B.
994fdc96-2dce-40f4-b74b-dc638286eb08
Sohi, Saran P.
a595774e-b59d-4aa2-b556-1c698361d000
Hooda, Peter S.
e0e628c5-d7dd-49b1-9bd7-3b4e96c78e91
Busquets, Rosa
d3f8511d-c34e-4bf7-956c-19e4c1c5949f

Melia, Patrick M., Cundy, Andrew B., Sohi, Saran P., Hooda, Peter S. and Busquets, Rosa (2017) Trends in the recovery of phosphorus in bioavailable forms from wastewater. Chemosphere, 186, 381-395. (doi:10.1016/j.chemosphere.2017.07.089).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Addressing food security issues arising from phosphorus (P) scarcity is described as one of the greatest global challenges of the 21st Century. Dependence on inorganic phosphate fertilisers derived from limited geological sources of P creates an urgent need to recover P from wastes and treated waters, in safe forms that are also effective agriculturally – the established process of P removal by chemical precipitation using Fe or Al salts, is effective for P removal but leads to residues with limited bioavailability and contamination concerns. One of the greatest opportunities for P recovery is at wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) where the crystallisation of struvite and Ca-P from enhanced biological P removal (EBPR) sludge is well developed and already shown to be economically and operationally feasible in some WWTPs. However, recovery through this approach can be limited to <25% efficiency unless chemical extraction is applied. Thermochemical treatment of sludge ash produces detoxified residues that are currently utilised by the fertiliser industry; wet chemical extraction can be economically feasible in recovering P and other by-products. The bioavailability of recovered P depends on soil pH as well as the P-rich material in question. Struvite is a superior recovered P product in terms of plant availability, while use of Ca-P and thermochemically treated sewage sludge ash is limited to acidic soils. These technologies, in addition to others less developed, will be commercially pushed forward by revised fertiliser legislation and foreseeable legislative limits for WWTPs to achieve discharges of <1 mg P/L.

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Final accepted manuscript_Chemosphere_PM - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 17 July 2017
Published date: 1 November 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 413088
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/413088
ISSN: 0045-6535
PURE UUID: 6298a6c7-dd4b-4144-b423-139b1b8cc2af
ORCID for Andrew B. Cundy: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4368-2569

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 15 Aug 2017 16:30
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 04:59

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