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Comparative analysis of domestic and feeder connected batteries for low voltage networks with high photovoltaic penetration

Comparative analysis of domestic and feeder connected batteries for low voltage networks with high photovoltaic penetration
Comparative analysis of domestic and feeder connected batteries for low voltage networks with high photovoltaic penetration
Excessive voltage and power flow issues associated with domestic solar power are threatening UK distribution system operation and the use of energy storage is one method proposed to mitigate these issues. In this study a data orientated approach was taken in order to simulate the effect of the location of the energy storage on the low voltage network. A number of small (<15 kWh) domestic batteries were compared to a single larger (>50 kWh) feeder connected battery in terms of their ability to shave load demand peaks, fill load demand valleys and counter voltage violations on a typical radial feeder system. To achieve this MatLab was used to create dispatch strategies for each battery and introduce them into an aggregated load, and OpenDSS was then used to model this scenario on a typical UK radial feeder based on the IEEE European Low Voltage Test Case. It was found that the feeder connected battery was more successful at mitigating the thermal overload effects of distributed generation at the low voltage level. Domestic batteries offer ease of installation and consumer support, likely to make their utilisation increasingly inevitable. However, their exposure to domestic energy flows and focus on minimising grid import to the home led to a reduced network level impact. This work shows that a feeder connected battery can respond to the power flows of the aggregated load and thus provides a far more capable tool for reducing network peak loads and preventing feeder system export.
2352-152X
334-343
Hilton, George
fd332562-ee82-4b62-b99c-0d0ee2e06ca1
Cruden, Andrew
ed709997-4402-49a7-9ad5-f4f3c62d29ab
Kent, Jeremy
61529fc5-089d-48b7-8326-a64774520eb1
Hilton, George
fd332562-ee82-4b62-b99c-0d0ee2e06ca1
Cruden, Andrew
ed709997-4402-49a7-9ad5-f4f3c62d29ab
Kent, Jeremy
61529fc5-089d-48b7-8326-a64774520eb1

Hilton, George, Cruden, Andrew and Kent, Jeremy (2017) Comparative analysis of domestic and feeder connected batteries for low voltage networks with high photovoltaic penetration. Journal of Energy Storage, 13, 334-343. (doi:10.1016/j.est.2017.07.019).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Excessive voltage and power flow issues associated with domestic solar power are threatening UK distribution system operation and the use of energy storage is one method proposed to mitigate these issues. In this study a data orientated approach was taken in order to simulate the effect of the location of the energy storage on the low voltage network. A number of small (<15 kWh) domestic batteries were compared to a single larger (>50 kWh) feeder connected battery in terms of their ability to shave load demand peaks, fill load demand valleys and counter voltage violations on a typical radial feeder system. To achieve this MatLab was used to create dispatch strategies for each battery and introduce them into an aggregated load, and OpenDSS was then used to model this scenario on a typical UK radial feeder based on the IEEE European Low Voltage Test Case. It was found that the feeder connected battery was more successful at mitigating the thermal overload effects of distributed generation at the low voltage level. Domestic batteries offer ease of installation and consumer support, likely to make their utilisation increasingly inevitable. However, their exposure to domestic energy flows and focus on minimising grid import to the home led to a reduced network level impact. This work shows that a feeder connected battery can respond to the power flows of the aggregated load and thus provides a far more capable tool for reducing network peak loads and preventing feeder system export.

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comparative-analysis-domestic (2) - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 23 July 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 31 August 2017
Published date: October 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 413138
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/413138
ISSN: 2352-152X
PURE UUID: 8f79e170-1581-4303-98e0-a7510750ceee
ORCID for Andrew Cruden: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3236-2535

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Date deposited: 16 Aug 2017 16:30
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 06:07

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