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The neural correlates of tic inhibition in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome

The neural correlates of tic inhibition in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome
The neural correlates of tic inhibition in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome

Tics in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) resemble fragments of normal motor behaviour but appear in an intrusive, repetitive and context-inappropriate manner. Although tics can be voluntarily inhibited on demand, the neural correlates of this process remain unclear. 14 GTS adults without relevant comorbidities participated in this study. First, tic severity and voluntary tic inhibitory capacity were evaluated outside the scanner. Second, patients were examined with resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (RS-fMRI) in two states, free ticcing and voluntary tic inhibition. Local synchronization of spontaneous fMRI-signal was analysed with regional homogeneity (ReHo) and differences between both states (free ticcing<tic inhibition) were contrasted. Clinical correlations of the resulting differential ReHo parameters between both states and clinical measures of tic frequency, voluntary tic inhibition and premonitory urges were also performed. ReHo of the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) was increased during voluntary tic inhibition compared to free ticcing. ReHo increases were positively correlated with participants׳ ability to inhibit their tics during scanning sessions but also outside the scanner. There was no correlation with ratings of premonitory urges. Voluntary tic inhibition is associated with increased ReHo of the left IFG. Premonitory urges are unrelated to this process.

Adolescent, Adult, Female, Humans, Inhibition (Psychology), Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Prefrontal Cortex, Tics, Tourette Syndrome, Young Adult, Journal Article, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
0028-3932
297-301
Ganos, Christos
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Kahl, Ursula
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Brandt, Valerie
e41f5832-70e4-407d-8a15-85b861761656
Schunke, Odette
aa9feb34-80a8-463a-ac58-3b2baba3826a
Bäumer, Tobias
90576a00-054a-4ab7-952e-d50b175f4cec
Thomalla, Götz
c4a9f295-d5b2-4e96-b725-fbea275ead30
Roessner, Veit
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Haggard, Patrick
b68055e6-ac9c-4422-9d2b-32d7d851fb7a
Münchau, Alexander
3254c1b7-9fd4-417d-96e2-b7bc1fe3c736
Kühn, Simone
84836c26-cb84-4545-ad9f-6758da227371
Ganos, Christos
b79910d0-7d4b-4d5a-a051-b82cfb64dcea
Kahl, Ursula
8eb7f05d-54f9-4825-8756-dc4b3004405e
Brandt, Valerie
e41f5832-70e4-407d-8a15-85b861761656
Schunke, Odette
aa9feb34-80a8-463a-ac58-3b2baba3826a
Bäumer, Tobias
90576a00-054a-4ab7-952e-d50b175f4cec
Thomalla, Götz
c4a9f295-d5b2-4e96-b725-fbea275ead30
Roessner, Veit
0dd2e5d8-8b67-445e-b074-1ed2dc597fdd
Haggard, Patrick
b68055e6-ac9c-4422-9d2b-32d7d851fb7a
Münchau, Alexander
3254c1b7-9fd4-417d-96e2-b7bc1fe3c736
Kühn, Simone
84836c26-cb84-4545-ad9f-6758da227371

Ganos, Christos, Kahl, Ursula, Brandt, Valerie, Schunke, Odette, Bäumer, Tobias, Thomalla, Götz, Roessner, Veit, Haggard, Patrick, Münchau, Alexander and Kühn, Simone (2014) The neural correlates of tic inhibition in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome. Neuropsychologia, 65, 297-301. (doi:10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2014.08.007).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Tics in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) resemble fragments of normal motor behaviour but appear in an intrusive, repetitive and context-inappropriate manner. Although tics can be voluntarily inhibited on demand, the neural correlates of this process remain unclear. 14 GTS adults without relevant comorbidities participated in this study. First, tic severity and voluntary tic inhibitory capacity were evaluated outside the scanner. Second, patients were examined with resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (RS-fMRI) in two states, free ticcing and voluntary tic inhibition. Local synchronization of spontaneous fMRI-signal was analysed with regional homogeneity (ReHo) and differences between both states (free ticcing<tic inhibition) were contrasted. Clinical correlations of the resulting differential ReHo parameters between both states and clinical measures of tic frequency, voluntary tic inhibition and premonitory urges were also performed. ReHo of the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) was increased during voluntary tic inhibition compared to free ticcing. ReHo increases were positively correlated with participants׳ ability to inhibit their tics during scanning sessions but also outside the scanner. There was no correlation with ratings of premonitory urges. Voluntary tic inhibition is associated with increased ReHo of the left IFG. Premonitory urges are unrelated to this process.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 14 August 2014
Published date: December 2014
Additional Information: Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Keywords: Adolescent, Adult, Female, Humans, Inhibition (Psychology), Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Prefrontal Cortex, Tics, Tourette Syndrome, Young Adult, Journal Article, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

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Local EPrints ID: 413291
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/413291
ISSN: 0028-3932
PURE UUID: 09bb4f25-7035-4181-ae47-605ad074212e

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Date deposited: 18 Aug 2017 16:32
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 20:11

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Contributors

Author: Christos Ganos
Author: Ursula Kahl
Author: Valerie Brandt
Author: Odette Schunke
Author: Tobias Bäumer
Author: Götz Thomalla
Author: Veit Roessner
Author: Patrick Haggard
Author: Alexander Münchau
Author: Simone Kühn

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