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Colorectal cancer patient’s self-efficacy for managing illness-related problems in the first 2 years after diagnosis, results from the ColoREctal Well-being (CREW) study

Colorectal cancer patient’s self-efficacy for managing illness-related problems in the first 2 years after diagnosis, results from the ColoREctal Well-being (CREW) study
Colorectal cancer patient’s self-efficacy for managing illness-related problems in the first 2 years after diagnosis, results from the ColoREctal Well-being (CREW) study
Purpose:

There is a growing emphasis on self-management of cancer aftercare. Little is known about patient’s self-efficacy (confidence) to manage illness-related problems and how this changes over time. This paper describes the patterns of self-efficacy for managing illness-related problems amongst colorectal cancer patients in the 2 years following diagnosis.
Methods:

In this prospective cohort study, questionnaires were administered at baseline (pre-surgery), 3, 9, 15 and 24 months to 872 colorectal cancer patients. Self-efficacy (confidence to manage illness-related problems), anxiety, social support, affect, socio-demographics, physical symptoms and clinical and treatment characteristics were assessed. Group-based trajectory analysis identified trajectories of self-efficacy up to 24 months and predictors.
Results:

Four trajectories of self-efficacy were identified: group 1 (very confident) 16.0% (95% confidence interval (CI) 10.7–21.3%), group 2 (confident) 45.6% (95% CI 40.3–51.0%), group 3 (moderately confident) 29.5% (95% CI 25.1–33.8%) and group 4 (low confidence) 8.9% (95% CI 6.4–11.4%). Greater deprivation, domestic status, more co-morbidities, worse fatigue and pain, lower positivity and greater negativity were significantly associated with lower self-efficacy. There was an increase in mean scores for self-efficacy over time for the whole sample, but this did not reach the cut-off for minimally important differences. At 2 years, the lowest level of confidence to manage was for symptoms or health problems.
Conclusion:

Around 40% of patients had suboptimal levels of confidence to manage illness-related problems with little change from the time of diagnosis across the four groups.
Implications for cancer survivors:

Screening for self-efficacy at diagnosis would enable targeted, early intervention which could in turn enhance health-related quality of life.
1932-2259
634-642
Grimmett, Chloe
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Haviland, Joanne
569aa43b-15bd-4e9d-b4a5-e68a84334cfe
Winter, Jane
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Calman, Lynn
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Din, Amy
4ca3c758-ec41-4c76-baf6-95ad788f5336
Richardson, Alison
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Smith, Peter W.F.
961a01a3-bf4c-43ca-9599-5be4fd5d3940
Foster, Claire
00786ac1-bd47-4aeb-a0e2-40e058695b73
Grimmett, Chloe
7f27e85b-2850-481d-a7dd-2835e1a925cd
Haviland, Joanne
569aa43b-15bd-4e9d-b4a5-e68a84334cfe
Winter, Jane
0f2074d8-4f8d-47fc-b501-15af65070e02
Calman, Lynn
9ae254eb-74a7-4906-9eb4-62ad99f058c1
Din, Amy
4ca3c758-ec41-4c76-baf6-95ad788f5336
Richardson, Alison
3db30680-aa47-43a5-b54d-62d10ece17b7
Smith, Peter W.F.
961a01a3-bf4c-43ca-9599-5be4fd5d3940
Foster, Claire
00786ac1-bd47-4aeb-a0e2-40e058695b73

Grimmett, Chloe, Haviland, Joanne, Winter, Jane, Calman, Lynn, Din, Amy, Richardson, Alison, Smith, Peter W.F. and Foster, Claire (2017) Colorectal cancer patient’s self-efficacy for managing illness-related problems in the first 2 years after diagnosis, results from the ColoREctal Well-being (CREW) study. Journal of Cancer Survivorship, 11 (5), 634-642. (doi:10.1007/s11764-017-0636-x).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Purpose:

There is a growing emphasis on self-management of cancer aftercare. Little is known about patient’s self-efficacy (confidence) to manage illness-related problems and how this changes over time. This paper describes the patterns of self-efficacy for managing illness-related problems amongst colorectal cancer patients in the 2 years following diagnosis.
Methods:

In this prospective cohort study, questionnaires were administered at baseline (pre-surgery), 3, 9, 15 and 24 months to 872 colorectal cancer patients. Self-efficacy (confidence to manage illness-related problems), anxiety, social support, affect, socio-demographics, physical symptoms and clinical and treatment characteristics were assessed. Group-based trajectory analysis identified trajectories of self-efficacy up to 24 months and predictors.
Results:

Four trajectories of self-efficacy were identified: group 1 (very confident) 16.0% (95% confidence interval (CI) 10.7–21.3%), group 2 (confident) 45.6% (95% CI 40.3–51.0%), group 3 (moderately confident) 29.5% (95% CI 25.1–33.8%) and group 4 (low confidence) 8.9% (95% CI 6.4–11.4%). Greater deprivation, domestic status, more co-morbidities, worse fatigue and pain, lower positivity and greater negativity were significantly associated with lower self-efficacy. There was an increase in mean scores for self-efficacy over time for the whole sample, but this did not reach the cut-off for minimally important differences. At 2 years, the lowest level of confidence to manage was for symptoms or health problems.
Conclusion:

Around 40% of patients had suboptimal levels of confidence to manage illness-related problems with little change from the time of diagnosis across the four groups.
Implications for cancer survivors:

Screening for self-efficacy at diagnosis would enable targeted, early intervention which could in turn enhance health-related quality of life.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 1 August 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 19 August 2017
Published date: October 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 413378
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/413378
ISSN: 1932-2259
PURE UUID: f8132b73-51d9-41c6-bccd-5998afc8fb11
ORCID for Chloe Grimmett: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7540-7206
ORCID for Lynn Calman: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9964-6017
ORCID for Alison Richardson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3127-5755
ORCID for Peter W.F. Smith: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4423-5410
ORCID for Claire Foster: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4703-8378

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 23 Aug 2017 16:31
Last modified: 27 Jan 2020 13:45

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Contributors

Author: Chloe Grimmett ORCID iD
Author: Joanne Haviland
Author: Jane Winter
Author: Lynn Calman ORCID iD
Author: Amy Din
Author: Claire Foster ORCID iD

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