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Ocean acidification effects on mesozooplankton community development: Results from a long-term mesocosm experiment

Ocean acidification effects on mesozooplankton community development: Results from a long-term mesocosm experiment
Ocean acidification effects on mesozooplankton community development: Results from a long-term mesocosm experiment
Ocean acidification may affect zooplankton directly by decreasing in pH, as well as indirectly via trophic pathways, where changes in carbon availability or pH effects on primary producers may cascade up the food web thereby altering ecosystem functioning and community composition. Here, we present results from a mesocosm experiment carried out during 113 days in the Gullmar Fjord, Skagerrak coast of Sweden, studying plankton responses to predicted end-of-century pCO2 levels. We did not observe any pCO2 effect on the diversity of the mesozooplankton community, but a positive pCO2 effect on the total mesozooplankton abundance. Furthermore, we observed species-specific sensitivities to pCO2 in the two major groups in this experiment, copepods and hydromedusae. Also stage-specific pCO2 sensitivities were detected in copepods, with copepodites being the most responsive stage. Focusing on the most abundant species, Pseudocalanus acuspes, we observed that copepodites were significantly more abundant in the high-pCO2 treatment during most of the experiment, probably fuelled by phytoplankton community responses to high-pCO2 conditions. Physiological and reproductive output was analysed on P. acuspes females through two additional laboratory experiments, showing no pCO2 effect on females’ condition nor on egg hatching. Overall, our results suggest that the Gullmar Fjord mesozooplankton community structure is not expected to change much under realistic end-of-century OA scenarios as used here. However, the positive pCO2 effect detected on mesozooplankton abundance could potentially affect biomass transfer to higher trophic levels in the future.
1932-6203
Algueró-Muñiz, María
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Alvarez-Fernandez, Santiago
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Thor, Peter
4356b4ce-61eb-4a49-aefe-75a6e667e74f
Bach, Lennart T.
d1390da7-06d0-4e3f-998c-3b925c9a3a19
Esposito, Mario
ec7184a9-d60e-4255-a8ea-5636d960d5df
Horn, Henriette G.
4f42fa7e-fb65-42dc-ac45-abd2304b54da
Ecker, Ursula
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Langer, Julia A. F.
36bd3464-ac33-4ac1-85cc-81946ba55774
Taucher, Jan
ec76e5da-01e5-4ce7-ad11-f41ef8d1b7a4
Malzahn, Arne M.
bafe94b8-8248-4b15-b811-370ca76b5ceb
Riebesell, Ulf
2218bcf4-b444-4a1a-b268-9875762de458
Boersma, Maarten
65832bdb-120e-439f-8aff-a16eddfa1705
Dam, Hans G.
e87200d2-5445-449d-8f0f-2c0cb7a67876
Algueró-Muñiz, María
0682c9a4-6c70-41e7-8445-b08a4580510f
Alvarez-Fernandez, Santiago
acd7d21a-2232-4c58-ad15-3ad78f4e2b38
Thor, Peter
4356b4ce-61eb-4a49-aefe-75a6e667e74f
Bach, Lennart T.
d1390da7-06d0-4e3f-998c-3b925c9a3a19
Esposito, Mario
ec7184a9-d60e-4255-a8ea-5636d960d5df
Horn, Henriette G.
4f42fa7e-fb65-42dc-ac45-abd2304b54da
Ecker, Ursula
1062a085-45b3-4d5a-baaf-3f0b345f08b1
Langer, Julia A. F.
36bd3464-ac33-4ac1-85cc-81946ba55774
Taucher, Jan
ec76e5da-01e5-4ce7-ad11-f41ef8d1b7a4
Malzahn, Arne M.
bafe94b8-8248-4b15-b811-370ca76b5ceb
Riebesell, Ulf
2218bcf4-b444-4a1a-b268-9875762de458
Boersma, Maarten
65832bdb-120e-439f-8aff-a16eddfa1705
Dam, Hans G.
e87200d2-5445-449d-8f0f-2c0cb7a67876

Algueró-Muñiz, María, Alvarez-Fernandez, Santiago, Thor, Peter, Bach, Lennart T., Esposito, Mario, Horn, Henriette G., Ecker, Ursula, Langer, Julia A. F., Taucher, Jan, Malzahn, Arne M., Riebesell, Ulf and Boersma, Maarten, Dam, Hans G.(ed.) (2017) Ocean acidification effects on mesozooplankton community development: Results from a long-term mesocosm experiment PLoS ONE, 12, (4) (doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0175851).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Ocean acidification may affect zooplankton directly by decreasing in pH, as well as indirectly via trophic pathways, where changes in carbon availability or pH effects on primary producers may cascade up the food web thereby altering ecosystem functioning and community composition. Here, we present results from a mesocosm experiment carried out during 113 days in the Gullmar Fjord, Skagerrak coast of Sweden, studying plankton responses to predicted end-of-century pCO2 levels. We did not observe any pCO2 effect on the diversity of the mesozooplankton community, but a positive pCO2 effect on the total mesozooplankton abundance. Furthermore, we observed species-specific sensitivities to pCO2 in the two major groups in this experiment, copepods and hydromedusae. Also stage-specific pCO2 sensitivities were detected in copepods, with copepodites being the most responsive stage. Focusing on the most abundant species, Pseudocalanus acuspes, we observed that copepodites were significantly more abundant in the high-pCO2 treatment during most of the experiment, probably fuelled by phytoplankton community responses to high-pCO2 conditions. Physiological and reproductive output was analysed on P. acuspes females through two additional laboratory experiments, showing no pCO2 effect on females’ condition nor on egg hatching. Overall, our results suggest that the Gullmar Fjord mesozooplankton community structure is not expected to change much under realistic end-of-century OA scenarios as used here. However, the positive pCO2 effect detected on mesozooplankton abundance could potentially affect biomass transfer to higher trophic levels in the future.

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Accepted/In Press date: 31 March 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 14 April 2017

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Local EPrints ID: 413413
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/413413
ISSN: 1932-6203
PURE UUID: bb61fa03-1e82-4f7f-92f2-63ef7b3f2f70

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Date deposited: 24 Aug 2017 16:30
Last modified: 02 Nov 2017 17:30

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Contributors

Author: María Algueró-Muñiz
Author: Santiago Alvarez-Fernandez
Author: Peter Thor
Author: Lennart T. Bach
Author: Mario Esposito
Author: Henriette G. Horn
Author: Ursula Ecker
Author: Julia A. F. Langer
Author: Jan Taucher
Author: Arne M. Malzahn
Author: Ulf Riebesell
Author: Maarten Boersma
Editor: Hans G. Dam

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