The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Anderson localization of visible light on a nanophotonic chip

Anderson localization of visible light on a nanophotonic chip
Anderson localization of visible light on a nanophotonic chip
Technological advances allow the control of light at the nanoscale and to strongly enhance the light–matter interaction in highly engineered devices. Enhancing the light–matter interaction is needed for applications in research areas such as quantum technology, energy harvesting, sensing, and biophotonics. Here, we show that a different approach, based on the use of disorder, rather than the precise engineering of the devices, and fabrication imperfections as a resource, can allow the efficient trapping of visible light on a chip. We demonstrate, for the first time to our knowledge, Anderson localization of light at visible wavelengths in a nanophotonic chip. Remarkably, we prove that disorder-induced localization is more efficient in confining visible light than highly engineered optical cavities, thus reversing the trend observed so far. We measure light-confinement quality factors approaching 10 000 that are significantly higher than values previously reported in two-dimensional photonic crystal cavities. These measurements are well explained using a three-dimensional Bloch mode expansion technique, where we also extract the mode quality factors and effective mode volume distributions of the localized modes. Furthermore, by implementing a sensitive imaging technique, we directly visualize the localized modes and measure their spatial extension. Even though the position where the cavities appear is not controlled, given the multiple scattering process at the basis of their formation, we are able to locate with nanometer-scale accuracy the position of the optical cavities. This is important for the deterministic coupling of emitters to the disorder-induced optical cavities and for assessing light localization. Our results show the potential of disorder as a novel resource for the efficient confinement of light and for the enhancement of the light–matter interaction in the visible range of wavelengths.
2274-2280
Crane, Tom
9f60e57e-6c22-4dc2-8290-2224b3a181e6
Trojak, Oliver, Joe
795f56e4-951b-48ec-95c3-8af4e0d8f3d5
Vasco, Juan Pablo
4f078caa-9e9f-42aa-a579-75bf6030899c
Hughes, Stephen
3e14ee79-db73-4e5a-8746-c7f3f30bfd84
Sapienza, Luca
a2e0cf6c-1f22-4a5a-87a2-ffab0e24e6ac
Crane, Tom
9f60e57e-6c22-4dc2-8290-2224b3a181e6
Trojak, Oliver, Joe
795f56e4-951b-48ec-95c3-8af4e0d8f3d5
Vasco, Juan Pablo
4f078caa-9e9f-42aa-a579-75bf6030899c
Hughes, Stephen
3e14ee79-db73-4e5a-8746-c7f3f30bfd84
Sapienza, Luca
a2e0cf6c-1f22-4a5a-87a2-ffab0e24e6ac

Crane, Tom, Trojak, Oliver, Joe, Vasco, Juan Pablo, Hughes, Stephen and Sapienza, Luca (2017) Anderson localization of visible light on a nanophotonic chip. ACS Photonics, 4 (9), 2274-2280. (doi:10.1021/acsphotonics.7b00517).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Technological advances allow the control of light at the nanoscale and to strongly enhance the light–matter interaction in highly engineered devices. Enhancing the light–matter interaction is needed for applications in research areas such as quantum technology, energy harvesting, sensing, and biophotonics. Here, we show that a different approach, based on the use of disorder, rather than the precise engineering of the devices, and fabrication imperfections as a resource, can allow the efficient trapping of visible light on a chip. We demonstrate, for the first time to our knowledge, Anderson localization of light at visible wavelengths in a nanophotonic chip. Remarkably, we prove that disorder-induced localization is more efficient in confining visible light than highly engineered optical cavities, thus reversing the trend observed so far. We measure light-confinement quality factors approaching 10 000 that are significantly higher than values previously reported in two-dimensional photonic crystal cavities. These measurements are well explained using a three-dimensional Bloch mode expansion technique, where we also extract the mode quality factors and effective mode volume distributions of the localized modes. Furthermore, by implementing a sensitive imaging technique, we directly visualize the localized modes and measure their spatial extension. Even though the position where the cavities appear is not controlled, given the multiple scattering process at the basis of their formation, we are able to locate with nanometer-scale accuracy the position of the optical cavities. This is important for the deterministic coupling of emitters to the disorder-induced optical cavities and for assessing light localization. Our results show the potential of disorder as a novel resource for the efficient confinement of light and for the enhancement of the light–matter interaction in the visible range of wavelengths.

Text
Anderson localisation of visible light on a - Accepted Manuscript
Download (12MB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 23 August 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 23 August 2017
Published date: 20 September 2017
Additional Information: The author has confirmed it is the AM that is attached. Record amended to reflect this.

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 413416
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/413416
PURE UUID: dfc6b887-bb4f-4ed6-834b-101f92d574d5
ORCID for Oliver, Joe Trojak: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2296-6036

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 24 Aug 2017 16:30
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 05:01

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×