The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

How nitrogen and sulphur addition, and a single drought event affect root phosphatase activity in Phalaris arundinacea

How nitrogen and sulphur addition, and a single drought event affect root phosphatase activity in Phalaris arundinacea
How nitrogen and sulphur addition, and a single drought event affect root phosphatase activity in Phalaris arundinacea

Conservation and restoration of fens and fen meadows often aim to reduce soil nutrients, mainly nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). The biogeochemistry of P has received much attention as P-enrichment is expected to negatively impact on species diversity in wetlands. It is known that N, sulphur (S) and hydrological conditions affect the biogeochemistry of P, yet their interactive effects on P-dynamics are largely unknown. Additionally, in Europe, climate change has been predicted to lead to increases in summer drought. We performed a greenhouse experiment to elucidate the interactive effects of N, S and a single drought event on the P-availability for Phalaris arundinacea. Additionally, the response of plant phosphatase activity to these factors was measured over the two year experimental period. In contrast to results from earlier experiments, our treatments hardly affected soil P-availability. This may be explained by the higher pH in our soils, hampering the formation of Fe-P or Fe-Al complexes. Addition of S, however, decreased the plants N:P ratio, indicating an effect of S on the N:P stoichiometry and an effect on the plant's P-demand. Phosphatase activity increased significantly after addition of S, but was not affected by the addition of N or a single drought event. Root phosphatase activity was also positively related to plant tissue N and P concentrations, plant N and P uptake, and plant aboveground biomass, suggesting that the phosphatase enzyme influences P-biogeochemistry. Our results demonstrated that it is difficult to predict the effects of wetland restoration, since the involved mechanisms are not fully understood. Short-term and long-term effects on root phosphatase activity may differ considerably. Additionally, the addition of S can lead to unexpected effects on the biogeochemistry of P. Our results showed that natural resource managers should be careful when restoring degraded fens or preventing desiccation of fen ecosystems.

N:P ratios, Phosphorus, Phosphorus uptake, Root-surface phosphatase, Sulphate induced enzyme activity, Wetlands
0048-9697
2342-2348
Robroek, B.J.M.
06dcb269-687c-41db-ab73-f61899617f92
Adema, Erwin B.
a17c1a06-0087-4e9c-88c2-1ade52dda972
Venterink, Harry Olde
0b558ab7-ec39-42c0-a6e8-3cbe0e3a0686
Leonardson, Lars
769b579b-8152-4ee7-a76f-f472ccad585a
Wassen, Martin J.
0f530153-e74d-49f3-99b0-9d1f191acc70
Robroek, B.J.M.
06dcb269-687c-41db-ab73-f61899617f92
Adema, Erwin B.
a17c1a06-0087-4e9c-88c2-1ade52dda972
Venterink, Harry Olde
0b558ab7-ec39-42c0-a6e8-3cbe0e3a0686
Leonardson, Lars
769b579b-8152-4ee7-a76f-f472ccad585a
Wassen, Martin J.
0f530153-e74d-49f3-99b0-9d1f191acc70

Robroek, B.J.M., Adema, Erwin B., Venterink, Harry Olde, Leonardson, Lars and Wassen, Martin J. (2009) How nitrogen and sulphur addition, and a single drought event affect root phosphatase activity in Phalaris arundinacea. Science of the Total Environment, 407 (7), 2342-2348. (doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2008.11.046).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Conservation and restoration of fens and fen meadows often aim to reduce soil nutrients, mainly nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). The biogeochemistry of P has received much attention as P-enrichment is expected to negatively impact on species diversity in wetlands. It is known that N, sulphur (S) and hydrological conditions affect the biogeochemistry of P, yet their interactive effects on P-dynamics are largely unknown. Additionally, in Europe, climate change has been predicted to lead to increases in summer drought. We performed a greenhouse experiment to elucidate the interactive effects of N, S and a single drought event on the P-availability for Phalaris arundinacea. Additionally, the response of plant phosphatase activity to these factors was measured over the two year experimental period. In contrast to results from earlier experiments, our treatments hardly affected soil P-availability. This may be explained by the higher pH in our soils, hampering the formation of Fe-P or Fe-Al complexes. Addition of S, however, decreased the plants N:P ratio, indicating an effect of S on the N:P stoichiometry and an effect on the plant's P-demand. Phosphatase activity increased significantly after addition of S, but was not affected by the addition of N or a single drought event. Root phosphatase activity was also positively related to plant tissue N and P concentrations, plant N and P uptake, and plant aboveground biomass, suggesting that the phosphatase enzyme influences P-biogeochemistry. Our results demonstrated that it is difficult to predict the effects of wetland restoration, since the involved mechanisms are not fully understood. Short-term and long-term effects on root phosphatase activity may differ considerably. Additionally, the addition of S can lead to unexpected effects on the biogeochemistry of P. Our results showed that natural resource managers should be careful when restoring degraded fens or preventing desiccation of fen ecosystems.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 15 March 2009
Keywords: N:P ratios, Phosphorus, Phosphorus uptake, Root-surface phosphatase, Sulphate induced enzyme activity, Wetlands

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 413682
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/413682
ISSN: 0048-9697
PURE UUID: f898ea5f-a343-4e55-a265-e1c715c96f9a
ORCID for B.J.M. Robroek: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6714-0652

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 31 Aug 2017 16:31
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 00:27

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×