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Sub-erythemal ultraviolet radiation reduces metabolic dysfunction in already overweight mice

Sub-erythemal ultraviolet radiation reduces metabolic dysfunction in already overweight mice
Sub-erythemal ultraviolet radiation reduces metabolic dysfunction in already overweight mice

Exposure to sunlight may limit cardiometabolic risk. In our previous studies, regular exposure to sub-erythemal (non-burning) ultraviolet radiation (UVR) reduced signs of adiposity and cardiometabolic dysfunction in mice fed a high-fat diet. Some of the observed effects were dependent on skin release of nitric oxide after UVR exposure. Here, we examine the effects of sub-erythemal UVR on signs of adiposity and metabolic dysfunction in already overweight mice, comparing the effects of two sunlamps with distinct emitted light spectra. Mice were fed a high-fat diet from 8 weeks of age, with UVR administered twice a week from 14 weeks of age until they were killed at 20 weeks of age. Mice were irradiated with the same dose of UVB radiation (1 kJ/m(2)) from either FS40 (65% UVB, 35% UVA) or CLEO (4% UVB, 96% UVA) sunlamps, but substantially more UVA from the latter. FS40 UVR (but not CLEO UVR) significantly reduced mouse weights and weight gain, compared to mice fed a high-fat diet (only). These effects were dependent on nitric oxide. Conversely, CLEO UVR (but not FS40 UVR) significantly reduced circulating LDL cholesterol. Both light sources reduced fasting insulin levels, and the extent of hepatic steatosis; the latter was reversed by topical application of cPTIO, suggesting an important role for skin release of nitric oxide in preventing hepatic lipid accumulation. These results suggest that there may be a number of benefits achieved by regular exposure to safe (non-burning) levels of sunlight or UV-containing phototherapy, with effects potentially dependent on the predominance of the wavelengths of UVR administered.

Journal Article
0022-0795
81-92
Fleury, Naomi
64f00027-4ad6-4b2f-a469-1d9eff9157f8
Feelisch, Martin
8c1b9965-8614-4e85-b2c6-458a2e17eafd
Hart, Prue H
30c350e2-ec01-48e9-8c5e-9ada39ab17ef
Weller, Richard B
f78cfd69-d557-4fef-bd8d-28a90367feea
Smoothy, Jordan
ee724408-eb83-45dc-be76-57cdce9b0a4a
Matthews, Vance B
e682da05-f506-4467-84b1-72ad0843e752
Gorman, Shelley
011f6b03-7b50-4c96-ab5e-9b0f6cc5c25d
Fleury, Naomi
64f00027-4ad6-4b2f-a469-1d9eff9157f8
Feelisch, Martin
8c1b9965-8614-4e85-b2c6-458a2e17eafd
Hart, Prue H
30c350e2-ec01-48e9-8c5e-9ada39ab17ef
Weller, Richard B
f78cfd69-d557-4fef-bd8d-28a90367feea
Smoothy, Jordan
ee724408-eb83-45dc-be76-57cdce9b0a4a
Matthews, Vance B
e682da05-f506-4467-84b1-72ad0843e752
Gorman, Shelley
011f6b03-7b50-4c96-ab5e-9b0f6cc5c25d

Fleury, Naomi, Feelisch, Martin, Hart, Prue H, Weller, Richard B, Smoothy, Jordan, Matthews, Vance B and Gorman, Shelley (2017) Sub-erythemal ultraviolet radiation reduces metabolic dysfunction in already overweight mice. Journal of Endocrinology, 233 (1), 81-92. (doi:10.1530/JOE-16-0616).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Exposure to sunlight may limit cardiometabolic risk. In our previous studies, regular exposure to sub-erythemal (non-burning) ultraviolet radiation (UVR) reduced signs of adiposity and cardiometabolic dysfunction in mice fed a high-fat diet. Some of the observed effects were dependent on skin release of nitric oxide after UVR exposure. Here, we examine the effects of sub-erythemal UVR on signs of adiposity and metabolic dysfunction in already overweight mice, comparing the effects of two sunlamps with distinct emitted light spectra. Mice were fed a high-fat diet from 8 weeks of age, with UVR administered twice a week from 14 weeks of age until they were killed at 20 weeks of age. Mice were irradiated with the same dose of UVB radiation (1 kJ/m(2)) from either FS40 (65% UVB, 35% UVA) or CLEO (4% UVB, 96% UVA) sunlamps, but substantially more UVA from the latter. FS40 UVR (but not CLEO UVR) significantly reduced mouse weights and weight gain, compared to mice fed a high-fat diet (only). These effects were dependent on nitric oxide. Conversely, CLEO UVR (but not FS40 UVR) significantly reduced circulating LDL cholesterol. Both light sources reduced fasting insulin levels, and the extent of hepatic steatosis; the latter was reversed by topical application of cPTIO, suggesting an important role for skin release of nitric oxide in preventing hepatic lipid accumulation. These results suggest that there may be a number of benefits achieved by regular exposure to safe (non-burning) levels of sunlight or UV-containing phototherapy, with effects potentially dependent on the predominance of the wavelengths of UVR administered.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 1 February 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 2 February 2017
Published date: 1 April 2017
Additional Information: © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.
Keywords: Journal Article

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 413699
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/413699
ISSN: 0022-0795
PURE UUID: 0e18e3a2-6d50-4a93-9154-3828f6b7d47d
ORCID for Martin Feelisch: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2320-1158

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Date deposited: 31 Aug 2017 16:31
Last modified: 03 Dec 2019 01:39

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Contributors

Author: Naomi Fleury
Author: Martin Feelisch ORCID iD
Author: Prue H Hart
Author: Richard B Weller
Author: Jordan Smoothy
Author: Vance B Matthews
Author: Shelley Gorman

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