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Characterisation of functionalised microbubbles for ultrasound imaging and therapy

Characterisation of functionalised microbubbles for ultrasound imaging and therapy
Characterisation of functionalised microbubbles for ultrasound imaging and therapy
Functionalised microbubbles have shown considerable potential both as contrast agents for ultrasound imaging and as a means of enhancing ultrasound mediated therapy. With the development of advanced techniques such as quantitative ultrasound imaging and targeted drug delivery, the accurate prediction of their response to ultrasound excitation is becoming increasingly important. Characterising microbubble behavior represents a considerable technical challenge on account of their small size (<10 µm diameter) and the ultrasound frequencies used to drive them in clinical applications (typically between 0.5 and 20 MHz). This chapter examines the three main techniques used for the characterization of microbubble dynamics: ultra-high speed video microscopy, laser scattering and acoustic attenuation and back scattering measurements. The principles of the techniques are introduced with examples of their applications and their relative advantages and disadvantages are then discussed. In the second half of the chapter magnetically functionalized microbubbles are used as a case study and results obtained using each of the three techniques are presented and compared. The chapter concludes with recommendations for combining different methods for microbubble characterization.
375-389
Springer International
Stride, Eleanor
c0143e95-81fa-47c8-b9bc-5b4fc319bba6
Mulvana, Helen
6949e0db-d48e-432b-9991-65ee4eca7833
Rademeyer, Paul
4b3230fc-5b4c-41af-9be3-bd080411488e
Carugo, Dario
0a4be6cd-e309-4ed8-a620-20256ce01179
Owen, Joshua
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Browning, Richard J.
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Tang, Mengxing
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Eckersley, Robert
c2d7a2bb-9c2d-4692-8365-14c115870a3d
Tsuji, K.
Stride, Eleanor
c0143e95-81fa-47c8-b9bc-5b4fc319bba6
Mulvana, Helen
6949e0db-d48e-432b-9991-65ee4eca7833
Rademeyer, Paul
4b3230fc-5b4c-41af-9be3-bd080411488e
Carugo, Dario
0a4be6cd-e309-4ed8-a620-20256ce01179
Owen, Joshua
4e7fc6bc-f2c5-4622-894f-9e811eca84cd
Browning, Richard J.
32d183de-738d-49d7-8e74-af7b0a18e73f
Tang, Mengxing
973ec625-507a-4b4c-9188-d811a2e92f19
Eckersley, Robert
c2d7a2bb-9c2d-4692-8365-14c115870a3d
Tsuji, K.

Stride, Eleanor, Mulvana, Helen, Rademeyer, Paul, Carugo, Dario, Owen, Joshua, Browning, Richard J., Tang, Mengxing and Eckersley, Robert (2018) Characterisation of functionalised microbubbles for ultrasound imaging and therapy In, Tsuji, K. (eds.) The Micro-World Observed by Ultra High-Speed Cameras: We See What You Don’t See. 1 ed. Cham, Springer International pp. 375-389. (doi:10.1007/978-3-319-61491-5_18).

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

Functionalised microbubbles have shown considerable potential both as contrast agents for ultrasound imaging and as a means of enhancing ultrasound mediated therapy. With the development of advanced techniques such as quantitative ultrasound imaging and targeted drug delivery, the accurate prediction of their response to ultrasound excitation is becoming increasingly important. Characterising microbubble behavior represents a considerable technical challenge on account of their small size (<10 µm diameter) and the ultrasound frequencies used to drive them in clinical applications (typically between 0.5 and 20 MHz). This chapter examines the three main techniques used for the characterization of microbubble dynamics: ultra-high speed video microscopy, laser scattering and acoustic attenuation and back scattering measurements. The principles of the techniques are introduced with examples of their applications and their relative advantages and disadvantages are then discussed. In the second half of the chapter magnetically functionalized microbubbles are used as a case study and results obtained using each of the three techniques are presented and compared. The chapter concludes with recommendations for combining different methods for microbubble characterization.

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e-pub ahead of print date: 1 September 2017
Published date: 2018

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Local EPrints ID: 413787
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/413787
PURE UUID: 69140136-f2c6-4b64-ae25-eba8b51ecf4f

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Date deposited: 06 Sep 2017 16:31
Last modified: 06 Sep 2017 16:31

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Contributors

Author: Eleanor Stride
Author: Helen Mulvana
Author: Paul Rademeyer
Author: Dario Carugo
Author: Joshua Owen
Author: Richard J. Browning
Author: Mengxing Tang
Author: Robert Eckersley
Editor: K. Tsuji

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