The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

State Authenticity as Fit to Environment (SAFE): the implications of social identity for fit, authenticity, and self-segregation

State Authenticity as Fit to Environment (SAFE): the implications of social identity for fit, authenticity, and self-segregation
State Authenticity as Fit to Environment (SAFE): the implications of social identity for fit, authenticity, and self-segregation
People seek out situations that “fit,” but the concept of fit is not well understood. We introduce State Authenticity as Fit to the Environment (SAFE), a conceptual framework for understanding how social identities motivate the situations that people approach or avoid. Drawing from but expanding the authenticity literature, we first outline three types of person–environment fit: self-concept fit, goal fit, and social fit. Each type of fit, we argue, facilitates cognitive fluency, motivational fluency, and social fluency that promote state authenticity and drive approach or avoidance behaviors. Using this model, we assert that contexts subtly signal social identities in ways that implicate each type of fit, eliciting state authenticity for advantaged groups but state inauthenticity for disadvantaged groups. Given that people strive to be authentic, these processes cascade down to self-segregation among social groups, reinforcing social inequalities. We conclude by mapping out directions for research on relevant mechanisms and boundary conditions.
Schmader, Toni
1778a325-870f-441a-a7d6-f2bced51a699
Sedikides, Constantine
9d45e66d-75bb-44de-87d7-21fd553812c2
Schmader, Toni
1778a325-870f-441a-a7d6-f2bced51a699
Sedikides, Constantine
9d45e66d-75bb-44de-87d7-21fd553812c2

Schmader, Toni and Sedikides, Constantine (2017) State Authenticity as Fit to Environment (SAFE): the implications of social identity for fit, authenticity, and self-segregation. Personality and Social Psychology Review. (doi:10.1177/1088868317734080).

Record type: Article

Abstract

People seek out situations that “fit,” but the concept of fit is not well understood. We introduce State Authenticity as Fit to the Environment (SAFE), a conceptual framework for understanding how social identities motivate the situations that people approach or avoid. Drawing from but expanding the authenticity literature, we first outline three types of person–environment fit: self-concept fit, goal fit, and social fit. Each type of fit, we argue, facilitates cognitive fluency, motivational fluency, and social fluency that promote state authenticity and drive approach or avoidance behaviors. Using this model, we assert that contexts subtly signal social identities in ways that implicate each type of fit, eliciting state authenticity for advantaged groups but state inauthenticity for disadvantaged groups. Given that people strive to be authentic, these processes cascade down to self-segregation among social groups, reinforcing social inequalities. We conclude by mapping out directions for research on relevant mechanisms and boundary conditions.

Text
Schmader & Sedikides, in press, PSPR - Accepted Manuscript
Download (610kB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 1 September 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 4 October 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 413824
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/413824
PURE UUID: 98e3cbe1-32b3-41e5-80d5-055bb51a5852

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 07 Sep 2017 16:31
Last modified: 10 Sep 2019 04:41

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×