The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Bone phenotype assessed by HRpQCT and associations with fracture risk in the GLOW study

Bone phenotype assessed by HRpQCT and associations with fracture risk in the GLOW study
Bone phenotype assessed by HRpQCT and associations with fracture risk in the GLOW study
The epidemiology and pathogenesis of fractures in postmenopausal women has previously been investigated in the Global Longitudinal study of Osteoporosis in Women (GLOW). To date, however, relationships between bone imaging outcomes and fracture have not been studied in this cohort. We examined relationships between high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HRpQCT) parameters and fracture in the UK arm of GLOW, performing a cluster analysis to assess if our findings were similar to observations reported from older participants of the Hertfordshire Cohort Study (HCS), and extended the analysis to include tibial measurements. We recorded fracture events and performed HRpQCT of the distal radius and tibia and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) of the hip in 321 women, mean age 70.6 (SD 5.4) years, identifying four clusters at each site. We saw differing relationships at the radius and tibia. Two radial clusters (3 and 4) had a significantly lower hip areal bone mineral density (p < 0.001) compared to Cluster 1; only individuals in Cluster 4 had a significantly higher risk of fracture (p = 0.005). At the tibia, clusters 1, 3 and 4 had lower hip areal bone mineral density (p < 0.001) compared to Cluster 2; individuals in Cluster 3 had a significantly higher risk of fracture (p = 0.009). In GLOW our findings at the radius were very similar to those previously reported in the HCS, suggesting that combining variables derived from HRpQCT may give useful information regarding fracture risk in populations where this modality is available. Further data relating to tibial HRpQCT-phenotype and fractures are provided in this paper, and would benefit from validation in other studies. Differences observed may reflect age differences in the two cohorts.
0171-967X
14–22
Litwic, Anna
5faa3ead-e7d1-4b1a-aa2d-f79444fa11e9
Westbury, Leo
5ed45df3-3df7-4bf9-bbad-07b63cd4b281
Robinson, D.E.
a89b4176-6b64-4be4-bbca-6b3c630f5570
Ward, Kathryn
39bd4db1-c948-4e32-930e-7bec8deb54c7
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Dennison, Elaine
ee647287-edb4-4392-8361-e59fd505b1d1
Litwic, Anna
5faa3ead-e7d1-4b1a-aa2d-f79444fa11e9
Westbury, Leo
5ed45df3-3df7-4bf9-bbad-07b63cd4b281
Robinson, D.E.
a89b4176-6b64-4be4-bbca-6b3c630f5570
Ward, Kathryn
39bd4db1-c948-4e32-930e-7bec8deb54c7
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Dennison, Elaine
ee647287-edb4-4392-8361-e59fd505b1d1

Litwic, Anna, Westbury, Leo, Robinson, D.E., Ward, Kathryn, Cooper, Cyrus and Dennison, Elaine (2018) Bone phenotype assessed by HRpQCT and associations with fracture risk in the GLOW study. Calcified Tissue International, 102 (1), 14–22. (doi:10.1007/s00223-017-0325-9).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The epidemiology and pathogenesis of fractures in postmenopausal women has previously been investigated in the Global Longitudinal study of Osteoporosis in Women (GLOW). To date, however, relationships between bone imaging outcomes and fracture have not been studied in this cohort. We examined relationships between high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HRpQCT) parameters and fracture in the UK arm of GLOW, performing a cluster analysis to assess if our findings were similar to observations reported from older participants of the Hertfordshire Cohort Study (HCS), and extended the analysis to include tibial measurements. We recorded fracture events and performed HRpQCT of the distal radius and tibia and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) of the hip in 321 women, mean age 70.6 (SD 5.4) years, identifying four clusters at each site. We saw differing relationships at the radius and tibia. Two radial clusters (3 and 4) had a significantly lower hip areal bone mineral density (p < 0.001) compared to Cluster 1; only individuals in Cluster 4 had a significantly higher risk of fracture (p = 0.005). At the tibia, clusters 1, 3 and 4 had lower hip areal bone mineral density (p < 0.001) compared to Cluster 2; individuals in Cluster 3 had a significantly higher risk of fracture (p = 0.009). In GLOW our findings at the radius were very similar to those previously reported in the HCS, suggesting that combining variables derived from HRpQCT may give useful information regarding fracture risk in populations where this modality is available. Further data relating to tibial HRpQCT-phenotype and fractures are provided in this paper, and would benefit from validation in other studies. Differences observed may reflect age differences in the two cohorts.

Text
GLOW cluster HRpQCT Sept rerevised - Accepted Manuscript
Download (146kB)
Text
Litwic 2018 Article Bone Phenotype Assessed By HRpQCTA - Version of Record
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (389kB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 5 September 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 14 September 2017
Published date: January 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 413910
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/413910
ISSN: 0171-967X
PURE UUID: c5a6f06c-f2f9-42b6-b0dd-67342b8eb05f
ORCID for Kathryn Ward: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7034-6750
ORCID for Cyrus Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709
ORCID for Elaine Dennison: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3048-4961

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 11 Sep 2017 16:31
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:26

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×