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Cenozoic evolution of the eastern Black Sea: a test of depth-dependent stretching models

Cenozoic evolution of the eastern Black Sea: a test of depth-dependent stretching models
Cenozoic evolution of the eastern Black Sea: a test of depth-dependent stretching models
Subsidence analysis of the eastern Black Sea basin suggests that the stratigraphy of this deep, extensional basin can be explained by a predominantly pure-shear stretching history. A strain-rate inversion method that assumes pure-shear extension obtains good fits between observed and predicted stratigraphy. A relatively pure-shear strain distribution is also obtained when a strain-rate inversion algorithm is applied that allows extension to vary with depth without assuming its existence or form. The timing of opening of the eastern Black Sea, which occupied a back-arc position during the closure of the Tethys Ocean, has also been a subject of intense debate; competing theories called for basin opening during the Jurassic, Cretaceous or Paleocene/Eocene. Our work suggests that extension likely continued into the early Cenozoic, in agreement with stratigraphic relationships onshore and with estimates for the timing of arc magmatism. Further basin deepening also appears to have occurred in the last 20 myr. This anomalous subsidence event is focused in the northern part of the basin and reaches its peak at 15–10 Ma. We suggest that this comparatively localized shortening is associated with the northward movement of the Arabian plate. We also explore the effects of paleowater depth and elastic thickness on the results. These parameters are controversial, particularly for deep-water basins and margins, but their estimation is a necessary step in any analysis of the tectonic subsidence record stored in stratigraphy.
black sea, extension, subsidence, strain rate
0012-821X
360-378
Shillington, Donna J.
e53cb591-7124-4886-88a5-1b92f65fb199
White, Nicky
e2df0d62-aa85-491e-bb99-ec0aff13b94e
Minshull, Timothy A.
bf413fb5-849e-4389-acd7-0cb0d644e6b8
Edwards, Glyn R.H.
3a31be69-1b49-4b9b-b717-a6ae2185f383
Jones, Stephen M.
ea872e90-f80c-4cb6-9edd-4c2b4cc4867a
Edwards, Rosemary A.
e733909a-1bd5-4302-ad8d-61e811b9d8fe
Scott, Caroline L.
dc4c2116-bf4a-4164-91b4-df93589e8a04
Shillington, Donna J.
e53cb591-7124-4886-88a5-1b92f65fb199
White, Nicky
e2df0d62-aa85-491e-bb99-ec0aff13b94e
Minshull, Timothy A.
bf413fb5-849e-4389-acd7-0cb0d644e6b8
Edwards, Glyn R.H.
3a31be69-1b49-4b9b-b717-a6ae2185f383
Jones, Stephen M.
ea872e90-f80c-4cb6-9edd-4c2b4cc4867a
Edwards, Rosemary A.
e733909a-1bd5-4302-ad8d-61e811b9d8fe
Scott, Caroline L.
dc4c2116-bf4a-4164-91b4-df93589e8a04

Shillington, Donna J., White, Nicky, Minshull, Timothy A., Edwards, Glyn R.H., Jones, Stephen M., Edwards, Rosemary A. and Scott, Caroline L. (2008) Cenozoic evolution of the eastern Black Sea: a test of depth-dependent stretching models. Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 265 (3-4), 360-378. (doi:10.1016/j.epsl.2007.10.033).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Subsidence analysis of the eastern Black Sea basin suggests that the stratigraphy of this deep, extensional basin can be explained by a predominantly pure-shear stretching history. A strain-rate inversion method that assumes pure-shear extension obtains good fits between observed and predicted stratigraphy. A relatively pure-shear strain distribution is also obtained when a strain-rate inversion algorithm is applied that allows extension to vary with depth without assuming its existence or form. The timing of opening of the eastern Black Sea, which occupied a back-arc position during the closure of the Tethys Ocean, has also been a subject of intense debate; competing theories called for basin opening during the Jurassic, Cretaceous or Paleocene/Eocene. Our work suggests that extension likely continued into the early Cenozoic, in agreement with stratigraphic relationships onshore and with estimates for the timing of arc magmatism. Further basin deepening also appears to have occurred in the last 20 myr. This anomalous subsidence event is focused in the northern part of the basin and reaches its peak at 15–10 Ma. We suggest that this comparatively localized shortening is associated with the northward movement of the Arabian plate. We also explore the effects of paleowater depth and elastic thickness on the results. These parameters are controversial, particularly for deep-water basins and margins, but their estimation is a necessary step in any analysis of the tectonic subsidence record stored in stratigraphy.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 26 October 2007
Published date: 30 January 2008
Keywords: black sea, extension, subsidence, strain rate
Organisations: Ocean and Earth Science, National Oceanography Centre,Southampton

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 41393
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/41393
ISSN: 0012-821X
PURE UUID: 21705cd7-526e-446a-9a2d-409d94e61b27
ORCID for Timothy A. Minshull: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8202-1379

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Date deposited: 31 Aug 2006
Last modified: 28 Oct 2023 01:46

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Contributors

Author: Donna J. Shillington
Author: Nicky White
Author: Glyn R.H. Edwards
Author: Stephen M. Jones
Author: Rosemary A. Edwards
Author: Caroline L. Scott

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