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Why most children think well of themselves

Why most children think well of themselves
Why most children think well of themselves
This research aimed to examine whether and why children hold favorable self‐conceptions (total N = 882 Dutch children, ages 8–12). Surveys (Studies 1–2) showed that children report strongly favorable self‐conceptions. For example, when describing themselves on an open‐ended measure, children mainly provided positive self‐conceptions—about four times more than neutral self‐conceptions, and about 11 times more than negative self‐conceptions. Experiments (Studies 3–4) demonstrated that children report favorable self‐conceptions, in part, to live up to social norms idealizing such self‐conceptions, and to avoid seeing or presenting themselves negatively. These findings advance understanding of the developing self‐concept and its valence: In middle and late childhood, children's self‐conceptions are robustly favorable and influenced by both external (social norms) and internal (self‐motives) forces.
0009-3920
1873-1884
Thomaes, Sander
ec762bc3-0df4-42c3-99f4-1a7b65f55053
Brummelman, Eddie
b35dff27-28b1-4184-ab81-da7815676194
Sedikides, Constantine
9d45e66d-75bb-44de-87d7-21fd553812c2
Thomaes, Sander
ec762bc3-0df4-42c3-99f4-1a7b65f55053
Brummelman, Eddie
b35dff27-28b1-4184-ab81-da7815676194
Sedikides, Constantine
9d45e66d-75bb-44de-87d7-21fd553812c2

Thomaes, Sander, Brummelman, Eddie and Sedikides, Constantine (2017) Why most children think well of themselves. Child Development, 88 (6), 1873-1884. (doi:10.1111/cdev.12937).

Record type: Review

Abstract

This research aimed to examine whether and why children hold favorable self‐conceptions (total N = 882 Dutch children, ages 8–12). Surveys (Studies 1–2) showed that children report strongly favorable self‐conceptions. For example, when describing themselves on an open‐ended measure, children mainly provided positive self‐conceptions—about four times more than neutral self‐conceptions, and about 11 times more than negative self‐conceptions. Experiments (Studies 3–4) demonstrated that children report favorable self‐conceptions, in part, to live up to social norms idealizing such self‐conceptions, and to avoid seeing or presenting themselves negatively. These findings advance understanding of the developing self‐concept and its valence: In middle and late childhood, children's self‐conceptions are robustly favorable and influenced by both external (social norms) and internal (self‐motives) forces.

Text
Thomaes, Brummelman, & Sedikides, 2017, Child Development - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 13 June 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 21 August 2017
Published date: November 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 414372
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/414372
ISSN: 0009-3920
PURE UUID: 22df73a5-c6e4-4e6a-b204-ac3e6c63b4a9

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 27 Sep 2017 16:30
Last modified: 18 Jan 2020 05:02

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