The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

The dynamics of social care and paid work in mid-life

The dynamics of social care and paid work in mid-life
The dynamics of social care and paid work in mid-life
Individuals’ involvement in multiple roles over the lifecourse, such as family roles (caring for older parents or dependent children) and paid employment may affect the balance of time dedicated to each role. Existing research has evidenced that a growing number of mid-life individuals are faced with ‘juggling’ multiple roles. This study investigates the relationship between the provision of informal care to older parents/parents-in-law and employment status of adult children in mid-life. The study analyses unique panel data for a cohort of individuals born in 1958 in Britain. The sample comprises all respondents who were at risk of providing care (i.e. with at least one surviving parent/parent-in-law) and who were in employment at age 46. Logistic regression is used to investigate the impact of caring at ages 46 & 50 on employment status at age 50, controlling for socio-demographic characteristics, respondent’s health status and partner’s employment status. Continuous or recurrent caring was significantly associated with reducing or stopping work, with the effects mediated by the carers’ own occupation and health status and by their partner’s employment status. Amongst those caring at age 50, those providing higher intensity care (10+ hours a week) were more likely to have adjusted their employment patterns than those in less intense caring roles, and male carers were more likely to have adjusted their employment patterns than female carers. Duration and intensity of care provision matter. The ability to combine paid work and parental care in mid-life will be increasingly important in the context of rising longevity.
Gomez Leon, Madelin
44f79aad-ff8a-4c16-ae07-23e6fbb7ee9b
Evandrou, Maria
cd2210ea-9625-44d7-b0f4-fc0721a25d28
Falkingham, Jane
8df36615-1547-4a6d-ad55-aa9496e85519
Vlachantoni, Athina
06a52fbb-f2a0-4c81-9fbc-d6efc736c6cb
Gomez Leon, Madelin
44f79aad-ff8a-4c16-ae07-23e6fbb7ee9b
Evandrou, Maria
cd2210ea-9625-44d7-b0f4-fc0721a25d28
Falkingham, Jane
8df36615-1547-4a6d-ad55-aa9496e85519
Vlachantoni, Athina
06a52fbb-f2a0-4c81-9fbc-d6efc736c6cb

Gomez Leon, Madelin, Evandrou, Maria, Falkingham, Jane and Vlachantoni, Athina (2017) The dynamics of social care and paid work in mid-life. British Society of Gerontology conference 2017: "Do Not Go Gentle" - Gerontology and a Good Old Age, Swansea, United Kingdom. 05 - 07 Jul 2017.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Poster)

Abstract

Individuals’ involvement in multiple roles over the lifecourse, such as family roles (caring for older parents or dependent children) and paid employment may affect the balance of time dedicated to each role. Existing research has evidenced that a growing number of mid-life individuals are faced with ‘juggling’ multiple roles. This study investigates the relationship between the provision of informal care to older parents/parents-in-law and employment status of adult children in mid-life. The study analyses unique panel data for a cohort of individuals born in 1958 in Britain. The sample comprises all respondents who were at risk of providing care (i.e. with at least one surviving parent/parent-in-law) and who were in employment at age 46. Logistic regression is used to investigate the impact of caring at ages 46 & 50 on employment status at age 50, controlling for socio-demographic characteristics, respondent’s health status and partner’s employment status. Continuous or recurrent caring was significantly associated with reducing or stopping work, with the effects mediated by the carers’ own occupation and health status and by their partner’s employment status. Amongst those caring at age 50, those providing higher intensity care (10+ hours a week) were more likely to have adjusted their employment patterns than those in less intense caring roles, and male carers were more likely to have adjusted their employment patterns than female carers. Duration and intensity of care provision matter. The ability to combine paid work and parental care in mid-life will be increasingly important in the context of rising longevity.

Text
BSG 2017 Poster_MGL_JF_ME_AV
Download (234kB)

More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 6 July 2017
Venue - Dates: British Society of Gerontology conference 2017: "Do Not Go Gentle" - Gerontology and a Good Old Age, Swansea, United Kingdom, 2017-07-05 - 2017-07-07

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 414388
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/414388
PURE UUID: 8c0a7df9-33bd-4190-b8a0-95de496cd6f0
ORCID for Maria Evandrou: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2115-9358
ORCID for Jane Falkingham: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7135-5875
ORCID for Athina Vlachantoni: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1539-3057

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 28 Sep 2017 16:31
Last modified: 27 Jan 2020 13:41

Export record

Contributors

Author: Madelin Gomez Leon
Author: Maria Evandrou ORCID iD
Author: Jane Falkingham ORCID iD

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×