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Failure mechanisms of skirted foundations in uplift and compression

Failure mechanisms of skirted foundations in uplift and compression
Failure mechanisms of skirted foundations in uplift and compression

Kinematic soil failure mechanisms around skirted foundations, embedded in lightly overconsolidated clay and subjected to undrained compression and tension, have been investigated through digital image analysis of drum centrifuge tests and compared with predictions from finite-element analyses. Analysis of images captured in the centrifuge tests showed that rather different kinematic mechanisms govern failure in tension and compression. In tension, a reverse end bearing mechanism involving a bulb of soil beneath the foundation was mobilised even for a skirt depth to foundation diameter ratio as low as 0·1. Bearing capacity factors from centrifuge tests for a selected embedment ratio were similar in compression and uplift despite the difference in associated failure mechanism. Comparison of the failure mechanisms observed in the centrifuge tests with those predicted by finite-element analyses shows some marked differences, in spite of close agreement of bearing capacity factors.

Centrifuge modelling, Failure, Footings, Foundations
1346-213X
47-62
Mana, Divya S K
14fc0e59-d5c5-4af9-a0d9-0f18976f6f6b
Gourvenec, Susan M.
6ff91ad8-1a91-42fe-a3f4-1b5d6f5ce0b8
Randolph, Mark F.
75caa33a-e630-4ae8-84cd-758797bf9633
Hossain, M. Shazzad
5c470e03-b06a-49e7-bce6-12b5e492840a
Mana, Divya S K
14fc0e59-d5c5-4af9-a0d9-0f18976f6f6b
Gourvenec, Susan M.
6ff91ad8-1a91-42fe-a3f4-1b5d6f5ce0b8
Randolph, Mark F.
75caa33a-e630-4ae8-84cd-758797bf9633
Hossain, M. Shazzad
5c470e03-b06a-49e7-bce6-12b5e492840a

Mana, Divya S K, Gourvenec, Susan M., Randolph, Mark F. and Hossain, M. Shazzad (2012) Failure mechanisms of skirted foundations in uplift and compression. International Journal of Physical Modelling in Geotechnics, 12 (2), 47-62. (doi:10.1680/ijpmg.11.00007).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Kinematic soil failure mechanisms around skirted foundations, embedded in lightly overconsolidated clay and subjected to undrained compression and tension, have been investigated through digital image analysis of drum centrifuge tests and compared with predictions from finite-element analyses. Analysis of images captured in the centrifuge tests showed that rather different kinematic mechanisms govern failure in tension and compression. In tension, a reverse end bearing mechanism involving a bulb of soil beneath the foundation was mobilised even for a skirt depth to foundation diameter ratio as low as 0·1. Bearing capacity factors from centrifuge tests for a selected embedment ratio were similar in compression and uplift despite the difference in associated failure mechanism. Comparison of the failure mechanisms observed in the centrifuge tests with those predicted by finite-element analyses shows some marked differences, in spite of close agreement of bearing capacity factors.

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More information

Published date: June 2012
Keywords: Centrifuge modelling, Failure, Footings, Foundations

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 414563
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/414563
ISSN: 1346-213X
PURE UUID: d7130e37-fda0-4cb3-86ae-e22891a09bb2
ORCID for Susan M. Gourvenec: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2628-7914

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 04 Oct 2017 16:30
Last modified: 18 Jul 2019 00:25

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