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Opportunities and challenges for energy harvesting sensor systems for harsh environments

Opportunities and challenges for energy harvesting sensor systems for harsh environments
Opportunities and challenges for energy harvesting sensor systems for harsh environments
Wireless sensing systems for harsh environments, especially at high temperatures, are of great interest to many industries. Wireless sensing systems consist of sensors, electronic interfaces and processors, energy harvesters, and wireless transmission modules. Real-time data collection from sensors, combined with data analytics, can improve safety and performance, and reduce operational and maintenance cost in harsh environments. Even though some sensors are available for harsh environments, it is still impossible to measure the real-time data wirelessly due to the lack of high temperature electronics and energy storage for the selected sensors. Typically, data is transferred with cables to cooler regions, where an external electronic box is set up. Due to complex wiring connections, reliability is poor, the sensor locations are restricted and the cost and weight of the sensing system is increased. In this paper, the limits of wireless sensing systems for high temperature applications are discussed and the opportunities for future research are outlined.
ACM
Zaghari, Bahareh
a0537db6-0dce-49a2-8103-0f4599ab5f6a
Weddell, Alexander
3d8c4d63-19b1-4072-a779-84d487fd6f03
White, Neil
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Zaghari, Bahareh
a0537db6-0dce-49a2-8103-0f4599ab5f6a
Weddell, Alexander
3d8c4d63-19b1-4072-a779-84d487fd6f03
White, Neil
c7be4c26-e419-4e5c-9420-09fc02e2ac9c

Zaghari, Bahareh, Weddell, Alexander and White, Neil (2017) Opportunities and challenges for energy harvesting sensor systems for harsh environments. In Proceedings of ENSsys’17. ACM. 3 pp . (In Press)

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Wireless sensing systems for harsh environments, especially at high temperatures, are of great interest to many industries. Wireless sensing systems consist of sensors, electronic interfaces and processors, energy harvesters, and wireless transmission modules. Real-time data collection from sensors, combined with data analytics, can improve safety and performance, and reduce operational and maintenance cost in harsh environments. Even though some sensors are available for harsh environments, it is still impossible to measure the real-time data wirelessly due to the lack of high temperature electronics and energy storage for the selected sensors. Typically, data is transferred with cables to cooler regions, where an external electronic box is set up. Due to complex wiring connections, reliability is poor, the sensor locations are restricted and the cost and weight of the sensing system is increased. In this paper, the limits of wireless sensing systems for high temperature applications are discussed and the opportunities for future research are outlined.

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ENSSYS2017-AfterReview - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Submitted date: 2017
Accepted/In Press date: 29 September 2017
Venue - Dates: 5th International Workshop on Energy Harvesting & Energy-Neutral Sensing Systems: ENSsys 2017, Delft, Netherlands, 2017-11-05 - 2017-11-08

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 414732
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/414732
PURE UUID: 5d71b34c-b5e5-4307-a796-55e5f504c03c
ORCID for Alexander Weddell: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6763-5460
ORCID for Neil White: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1532-6452

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 09 Oct 2017 16:30
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 05:33

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Contributors

Author: Bahareh Zaghari
Author: Alexander Weddell ORCID iD
Author: Neil White ORCID iD

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