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Non-specific mechanisms in orthodox and complementary /alternative management of back pain (The MOCAM Study): recruitment rates and challenges

Non-specific mechanisms in orthodox and complementary /alternative management of back pain (The MOCAM Study): recruitment rates and challenges
Non-specific mechanisms in orthodox and complementary /alternative management of back pain (The MOCAM Study): recruitment rates and challenges

Purpose and Background The MOCAM study is a major prospective questionnaire-based study investigating the relationship between low back pain (LBP) patient outcomes and non-specific treatment components, i.e., therapeutic relationship, healthcare environment, incidental treatment characteristics, patients' beliefs and practitioners' beliefs. Participating acupuncturists, osteopaths, and physiotherapists from the NHS and private sector have been asked to recruit at least 10 patients into the study. This paper aims to analyse current recruitment rates from MOCAM and identify barriers and facilitators to effective recruitment.


Methods and Results Recruitment has taken place over 15 months. Invitation letters or emails were sent to individual practitioners identified using online search tools and professional networks. Recruitment rates were analysed descriptively. Within the private sector, response rates (number participating/number invited) are: acupuncturists 3% (49/1561), osteopaths 6% (53/912), physiotherapists 4% (40/1048). Private sector practitioners have each recruited on average 1, 4, and 2 patients into the study respectively. Within the NHS, the response rates are: acupuncturists 100% (2/2), osteopaths 8% (1/13), physiotherapists 63% (44/70). NHS practitioners have each recruited on average 4, 3, and 2 patients respectively.


Conclusions Recruiting practitioners has been challenging. While the response rates in the NHS are higher than in the private sector the absolute number of acupuncturists and osteopaths participating from the NHS is very low. This may be due to changes in the NHS commissioning landscape. However, further investigation is required to confirm this. The higher recruitment rates of patients from NHS settings may reflect different patient populations across sectors.

No conflicts of interest
Funding: This work was supported by Arthritis Research UK Special Strategic Award grant number 20552.
1358-992X
Al-Abbadey, M.
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Bradbury, K.
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Carnes, D.
bd9800b7-b0aa-46f0-b7f0-bcff5f8f0326
Dimitrov, B.D.
366d715f-ffd9-45a1-8415-65de5488472f
Fawkes, C.
cecfdb9d-8d21-470e-8c7c-975053b1be4a
Foster, J.
4a1a026e-12dc-41b8-a479-74afd6344893
Lewith, G.
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MacPherson, H.
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Roberts, L.
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Parry, L.
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Yardley, L.
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Bishop, F.L.
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Al-Abbadey, M.
dca88133-5d37-479e-a0c2-6d2aa19c7da7
Bradbury, K.
87fce0b9-d9c5-42b4-b041-bffeb4430863
Carnes, D.
bd9800b7-b0aa-46f0-b7f0-bcff5f8f0326
Dimitrov, B.D.
366d715f-ffd9-45a1-8415-65de5488472f
Fawkes, C.
cecfdb9d-8d21-470e-8c7c-975053b1be4a
Foster, J.
4a1a026e-12dc-41b8-a479-74afd6344893
Lewith, G.
0fc483fa-f17b-47c5-94d9-5c15e65a7625
MacPherson, H.
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Roberts, L.
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Parry, L.
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Yardley, L.
64be42c4-511d-484d-abaa-f8813452a22e
Bishop, F.L.
1f5429c5-325f-4ac4-aae3-6ba85d079928

Al-Abbadey, M., Bradbury, K., Carnes, D., Dimitrov, B.D., Fawkes, C., Foster, J., Lewith, G., MacPherson, H., Roberts, L., Parry, L., Yardley, L. and Bishop, F.L. (2017) Non-specific mechanisms in orthodox and complementary /alternative management of back pain (The MOCAM Study): recruitment rates and challenges Orthopaedic Proceedings, 99-B, (SUPP 10 11)

Record type: Meeting abstract

Abstract


Purpose and Background The MOCAM study is a major prospective questionnaire-based study investigating the relationship between low back pain (LBP) patient outcomes and non-specific treatment components, i.e., therapeutic relationship, healthcare environment, incidental treatment characteristics, patients' beliefs and practitioners' beliefs. Participating acupuncturists, osteopaths, and physiotherapists from the NHS and private sector have been asked to recruit at least 10 patients into the study. This paper aims to analyse current recruitment rates from MOCAM and identify barriers and facilitators to effective recruitment.


Methods and Results Recruitment has taken place over 15 months. Invitation letters or emails were sent to individual practitioners identified using online search tools and professional networks. Recruitment rates were analysed descriptively. Within the private sector, response rates (number participating/number invited) are: acupuncturists 3% (49/1561), osteopaths 6% (53/912), physiotherapists 4% (40/1048). Private sector practitioners have each recruited on average 1, 4, and 2 patients into the study respectively. Within the NHS, the response rates are: acupuncturists 100% (2/2), osteopaths 8% (1/13), physiotherapists 63% (44/70). NHS practitioners have each recruited on average 4, 3, and 2 patients respectively.


Conclusions Recruiting practitioners has been challenging. While the response rates in the NHS are higher than in the private sector the absolute number of acupuncturists and osteopaths participating from the NHS is very low. This may be due to changes in the NHS commissioning landscape. However, further investigation is required to confirm this. The higher recruitment rates of patients from NHS settings may reflect different patient populations across sectors.

No conflicts of interest
Funding: This work was supported by Arthritis Research UK Special Strategic Award grant number 20552.

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e-pub ahead of print date: 22 May 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 414742
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/414742
ISSN: 1358-992X
PURE UUID: 7d12b7f5-768e-4cde-aaa2-c344e92a316b
ORCID for M. Al-Abbadey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6307-9196
ORCID for K. Bradbury: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5513-7571
ORCID for F.L. Bishop: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8737-6662

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Date deposited: 10 Oct 2017 16:31
Last modified: 10 Oct 2017 16:31

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Contributors

Author: M. Al-Abbadey ORCID iD
Author: K. Bradbury ORCID iD
Author: D. Carnes
Author: B.D. Dimitrov
Author: C. Fawkes
Author: J. Foster
Author: G. Lewith
Author: H. MacPherson
Author: L. Roberts
Author: L. Parry
Author: L. Yardley
Author: F.L. Bishop ORCID iD

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