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Hydrostatic pressure and temperature affect the tolerance of the free-living marine nematode Halomonhystera disjuncta to acute copper exposure

Hydrostatic pressure and temperature affect the tolerance of the free-living marine nematode Halomonhystera disjuncta to acute copper exposure
Hydrostatic pressure and temperature affect the tolerance of the free-living marine nematode Halomonhystera disjuncta to acute copper exposure
Potential deep-sea mineral extraction poses new challenges for ecotoxicological research since little is known about effects of abiotic conditions present in the deep sea on the toxicity of heavy metals. Due to the difficulty of collecting and maintaining deep-sea organisms alive, a first step would be to understand the effects of high hydrostatic pressure and low temperatures on heavy metal toxicity using shallow-water relatives of deep-sea species. Here, we present the results of acute copper toxicity tests on the free-living shallow-water marine nematode Halomonhystera disjuncta, which has close phylogenetic and ecological links to the bathyal species Halomonhystera hermesi. Copper toxicity was assessed using a semi-liquid gellan gum medium at two levels of hydrostatic pressure (0.1 MPa and 10 MPa) and temperature (10 °C and 20 °C) in a fully crossed design. Mortality of nematodes in each treatment was assessed at 4 time intervals (24 and 48 h for all experiments and additionally 72 and 96 h for experiments run at 10 °C). LC50 values ranged between 0.561 and 1.864 mg Cu2+ L−1 and showed a decreasing trend with incubation time. Exposure to high hydrostatic pressure significantly increased sensitivity of nematodes to copper, whereas lower temperature resulted in an apparently increased copper tolerance, possibly as a result of a slower metabolism under low temperatures. These results indicate that hydrostatic pressure and temperature significantly affect metal toxicity and therefore need to be considered in toxicity assessments for deep-sea species. Any application of pollution limits derived from studies of shallow-water species to the deep-sea mining context must be done cautiously, with consideration of the effects of both stressors.
0166-445X
178-183
Mevenkamp, Lisa
46c50979-4e34-4721-b9a6-b36a5bb77eb8
Brown, Alastair
909f34db-bc9c-403f-ba8f-31aee1c00161
Hauton, Chris
7706f6ba-4497-42b2-8c6d-00df81676331
Kordas, Anna
8d3778f1-2740-4e8f-8d44-8a25d1f4cf59
Thatje, Sven
f1011fe3-1048-40c0-97c1-e93b796e6533
Vanreusel, Ann
29065a5d-c818-44d7-a81a-dac4da45b09e
Mevenkamp, Lisa
46c50979-4e34-4721-b9a6-b36a5bb77eb8
Brown, Alastair
909f34db-bc9c-403f-ba8f-31aee1c00161
Hauton, Chris
7706f6ba-4497-42b2-8c6d-00df81676331
Kordas, Anna
8d3778f1-2740-4e8f-8d44-8a25d1f4cf59
Thatje, Sven
f1011fe3-1048-40c0-97c1-e93b796e6533
Vanreusel, Ann
29065a5d-c818-44d7-a81a-dac4da45b09e

Mevenkamp, Lisa, Brown, Alastair, Hauton, Chris, Kordas, Anna, Thatje, Sven and Vanreusel, Ann (2017) Hydrostatic pressure and temperature affect the tolerance of the free-living marine nematode Halomonhystera disjuncta to acute copper exposure. Aquatic Toxicology, 192, 178-183. (doi:10.1016/j.aquatox.2017.09.016).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Potential deep-sea mineral extraction poses new challenges for ecotoxicological research since little is known about effects of abiotic conditions present in the deep sea on the toxicity of heavy metals. Due to the difficulty of collecting and maintaining deep-sea organisms alive, a first step would be to understand the effects of high hydrostatic pressure and low temperatures on heavy metal toxicity using shallow-water relatives of deep-sea species. Here, we present the results of acute copper toxicity tests on the free-living shallow-water marine nematode Halomonhystera disjuncta, which has close phylogenetic and ecological links to the bathyal species Halomonhystera hermesi. Copper toxicity was assessed using a semi-liquid gellan gum medium at two levels of hydrostatic pressure (0.1 MPa and 10 MPa) and temperature (10 °C and 20 °C) in a fully crossed design. Mortality of nematodes in each treatment was assessed at 4 time intervals (24 and 48 h for all experiments and additionally 72 and 96 h for experiments run at 10 °C). LC50 values ranged between 0.561 and 1.864 mg Cu2+ L−1 and showed a decreasing trend with incubation time. Exposure to high hydrostatic pressure significantly increased sensitivity of nematodes to copper, whereas lower temperature resulted in an apparently increased copper tolerance, possibly as a result of a slower metabolism under low temperatures. These results indicate that hydrostatic pressure and temperature significantly affect metal toxicity and therefore need to be considered in toxicity assessments for deep-sea species. Any application of pollution limits derived from studies of shallow-water species to the deep-sea mining context must be done cautiously, with consideration of the effects of both stressors.

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Mevenkamp&al._Aqua_Toxicol_17_accepted - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 19 September 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 20 September 2017
Published date: 1 November 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 414745
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/414745
ISSN: 0166-445X
PURE UUID: 38def807-aa16-4476-a690-c54806ba4147
ORCID for Chris Hauton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2313-4226

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Date deposited: 10 Oct 2017 16:31
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 16:46

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Contributors

Author: Lisa Mevenkamp
Author: Alastair Brown
Author: Chris Hauton ORCID iD
Author: Anna Kordas
Author: Sven Thatje
Author: Ann Vanreusel

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