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Thermal comfort and productivity – What can the chair tell us?

Thermal comfort and productivity – What can the chair tell us?
Thermal comfort and productivity – What can the chair tell us?
Past research has suggested that there is a relationship between people who report dissatisfaction with their indoor environment and those that report the office environment to be affecting their productivity. Currently, there is no method to assess productivity objectively. This study develops a new method to measure productivity and thermal comfort of offices’ occupants. Mixed-method approach was used to monitor concurrently environmental conditions, office chair movements, self-assessed productivity, and thermal comfort. 3-Axis accelerometers fixed on office chairs were used to monitor occupants’ movement while sitting down. The general idea is the more 'twitchy' the chair is, the more productive a person can be. This study involves 6 participants monitored for 4 weeks. Results show that there is a significant relationship between occupants’ perceived productivity and occupants’ chair movement. Furthermore, the analysis explored the lag effect of environmental variables on perceived productivity, at the time of the survey, one hour prior to the survey, and for a whole day.
Thermal Comfort, Productivity, Accelerometer, Office Buildings, Occupants behaviour, Mixed-method approach
Nariswari, Dionysia Bema
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Gauthier, Stephanie
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Nariswari, Dionysia Bema
c4a668b9-f112-48a4-8b88-21da091216af
Gauthier, Stephanie
4e7702f7-e1a9-4732-8430-fabbed0f56ed

Nariswari, Dionysia Bema and Gauthier, Stephanie (2016) Thermal comfort and productivity – What can the chair tell us? In roceedings of the 6th Masters Conference: People and Buildings. London, UK, 23rd September 2016. Network for Comfort and Energy Use in Buildings.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Past research has suggested that there is a relationship between people who report dissatisfaction with their indoor environment and those that report the office environment to be affecting their productivity. Currently, there is no method to assess productivity objectively. This study develops a new method to measure productivity and thermal comfort of offices’ occupants. Mixed-method approach was used to monitor concurrently environmental conditions, office chair movements, self-assessed productivity, and thermal comfort. 3-Axis accelerometers fixed on office chairs were used to monitor occupants’ movement while sitting down. The general idea is the more 'twitchy' the chair is, the more productive a person can be. This study involves 6 participants monitored for 4 weeks. Results show that there is a significant relationship between occupants’ perceived productivity and occupants’ chair movement. Furthermore, the analysis explored the lag effect of environmental variables on perceived productivity, at the time of the survey, one hour prior to the survey, and for a whole day.

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More information

Published date: 23 September 2016
Keywords: Thermal Comfort, Productivity, Accelerometer, Office Buildings, Occupants behaviour, Mixed-method approach

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 414905
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/414905
PURE UUID: a09b4c16-def3-4448-9507-114e9257f943
ORCID for Stephanie Gauthier: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1720-1736

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 16 Oct 2017 16:30
Last modified: 27 Jan 2020 13:48

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