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Ventilation assessment and comfort implications in a student halls of residence

Ventilation assessment and comfort implications in a student halls of residence
Ventilation assessment and comfort implications in a student halls of residence
Window behaviour is a key driver of energy consumption and has a significant impact on occupant comfort. This study investigated patterns and drivers of window behaviour in a student halls of residence using a mixed-method approach. Twenty-one occupants of Mayflower Halls in Southampton have taken part in the study over the summer of 2017. Occupant surveys include a background interview and a weekly survey (for 6 consecutive weeks) with questions on their perception of the indoor environment as well as a self-reported use of the building controls available in occupant’s rooms (e.g. windows, curtain). The environmental monitoring recorded air temperature, relative humidity and window movement. The results showed that a large percentage of participants (67%) were dissatisfied with the ventilation, thermal conditions and noise in their rooms, and would prefer to have more air movement. To address these issues, the paper suggests a series of recommendations for building management and retrofit options.
Occupants Behaviour, Environmental comfort, indoor air quality, Building retrofit
Li, Keying
f574ba36-5702-4b70-8274-61788e837f31
Gauthier, Stephanie
4e7702f7-e1a9-4732-8430-fabbed0f56ed
Li, Keying
f574ba36-5702-4b70-8274-61788e837f31
Gauthier, Stephanie
4e7702f7-e1a9-4732-8430-fabbed0f56ed

Li, Keying and Gauthier, Stephanie (2017) Ventilation assessment and comfort implications in a student halls of residence. In Proceedings of the 7th Masters Conference: People and Buildings. London, UK, 22th September 2017. Network for Comfort and Energy Use in Buildings.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Window behaviour is a key driver of energy consumption and has a significant impact on occupant comfort. This study investigated patterns and drivers of window behaviour in a student halls of residence using a mixed-method approach. Twenty-one occupants of Mayflower Halls in Southampton have taken part in the study over the summer of 2017. Occupant surveys include a background interview and a weekly survey (for 6 consecutive weeks) with questions on their perception of the indoor environment as well as a self-reported use of the building controls available in occupant’s rooms (e.g. windows, curtain). The environmental monitoring recorded air temperature, relative humidity and window movement. The results showed that a large percentage of participants (67%) were dissatisfied with the ventilation, thermal conditions and noise in their rooms, and would prefer to have more air movement. To address these issues, the paper suggests a series of recommendations for building management and retrofit options.

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MC2017 Li Keying - Author's Original
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More information

Published date: 22 September 2017
Venue - Dates: 7th Masters Conference: People and Buildings: Network for Comfort and Energy Use in Buildings, United Kingdom, 2017-09-22 - 2017-09-22
Keywords: Occupants Behaviour, Environmental comfort, indoor air quality, Building retrofit

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 414906
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/414906
PURE UUID: 8379da5b-2ea2-4581-a231-79a117199453
ORCID for Stephanie Gauthier: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1720-1736

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 16 Oct 2017 16:30
Last modified: 27 Jan 2020 13:48

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