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Close the energy performance gap, a window at a time

Close the energy performance gap, a window at a time
Close the energy performance gap, a window at a time
This research aims to quantify occupants’ window behaviour impact to the energy performance gap. Occupants’ window behaviour poses a real challenge to energy demand control in mixed-mode buildings. A window being left open, may compromise the efficiency of the ventilation system. Applying a mixed-method approach, this study was carried out over the summer of 2017, in a mixed mode office building at the University of Southampton. Dry bulb temperature, radiant temperature, relative humidity, CO2 and window movement were recorded. Concurrently a weekly questionnaire gathered environmental perception from 35 participants. Using TRNSYS, the results of the monitoring were compared to standard assumptions. Results indicate that windows activity plays a significant part in bridging the performance gap between design and actual energy consumption. Furthermore, the results of the questionnaires revealed participants’ rationales for window opening and closing behaviours. Although this study comprises of a small sample in temperate climate, implications of this research addresses key issues for researchers investigating behaviour modelling and practitioners initiating building design.
Mixed Mode Building, Occupants Behaviour, Energy Performance Gap, Dynamic Thermal Modelling
Pradana, Muhamad
41f32860-d4bb-4335-a1f6-cb1000d42ade
Gauthier, Stephanie
4e7702f7-e1a9-4732-8430-fabbed0f56ed
Bourikas, Leonidas
5faf69fc-1b5a-4613-ae9f-cd135092af9c
Pradana, Muhamad
41f32860-d4bb-4335-a1f6-cb1000d42ade
Gauthier, Stephanie
4e7702f7-e1a9-4732-8430-fabbed0f56ed
Bourikas, Leonidas
5faf69fc-1b5a-4613-ae9f-cd135092af9c

Pradana, Muhamad, Gauthier, Stephanie and Bourikas, Leonidas (2017) Close the energy performance gap, a window at a time In Proceedings of the 7th Masters Conference: People and Buildings. London, UK, 22th September 2017. Network for Comfort and Energy Use in Buildings.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

This research aims to quantify occupants’ window behaviour impact to the energy performance gap. Occupants’ window behaviour poses a real challenge to energy demand control in mixed-mode buildings. A window being left open, may compromise the efficiency of the ventilation system. Applying a mixed-method approach, this study was carried out over the summer of 2017, in a mixed mode office building at the University of Southampton. Dry bulb temperature, radiant temperature, relative humidity, CO2 and window movement were recorded. Concurrently a weekly questionnaire gathered environmental perception from 35 participants. Using TRNSYS, the results of the monitoring were compared to standard assumptions. Results indicate that windows activity plays a significant part in bridging the performance gap between design and actual energy consumption. Furthermore, the results of the questionnaires revealed participants’ rationales for window opening and closing behaviours. Although this study comprises of a small sample in temperate climate, implications of this research addresses key issues for researchers investigating behaviour modelling and practitioners initiating building design.

Text MC2017_Pradana_Muhamad - Author's Original
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More information

Published date: 22 September 2017
Additional Information: http://nceub.org.uk/ocs/index.php/MC2017/MC2017
Keywords: Mixed Mode Building, Occupants Behaviour, Energy Performance Gap, Dynamic Thermal Modelling

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 414907
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/414907
PURE UUID: 11b89eb8-0ba2-49ff-bd1f-849c1c3d4dc3
ORCID for Stephanie Gauthier: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1720-1736
ORCID for Leonidas Bourikas: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5289-2157

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 16 Oct 2017 16:30
Last modified: 22 Feb 2018 17:32

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Contributors

Author: Muhamad Pradana
Author: Leonidas Bourikas ORCID iD

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