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Enhancing resilience to coastal flooding from severe storms in the USA: international lessons

Enhancing resilience to coastal flooding from severe storms in the USA: international lessons
Enhancing resilience to coastal flooding from severe storms in the USA: international lessons
Recent events in the USA have highlighted a lack of resilience in the coastal population to coastal flooding, especially amongst disadvantaged and isolated communities. Some low-income countries, such as Cuba and Bangladesh, have made significant progress towards transformed societies that are more resilient to the impacts of cyclones and coastal flooding. To understand how this has come about, a systematic review of the peer-reviewed and grey literature related to resilience of communities to coastal flooding was undertaken in both countries. In both Cuba and Bangladesh the trust between national and local authorities, community leaders and civil society is high. As a consequence evacuation warnings are generally followed and communities are well prepared.
As a result over the past 25 years in Bangladesh the number of deaths directly related to cyclones and coastal flooding has decreased, despite an increase of almost 50% in the number of people exposed to these hazards. In Cuba, over the course of eight hurricanes between 2003 and 2011, the normalized number of deaths related to cyclones and coastal floods was an order of magnitude less than in the USA. In low-income countries, warning systems and effective shelter/ evacuation systems, combined with high levels of disaster risk-reduction education and social cohesion, coupled with trust between government authorities and vulnerable communities can help to increase resilience to coastal hazards and tropical cyclones. In the USA, transferable lessons include improving communication and the awareness of the risks posed by coastal surges, mainstreaming disaster risk reduction into the education system and building trusted community networks to help isolated and disadvantaged communities, and improve community resilience
1561-8633
1357–1373
Lumbroso, Darren
26c7f97c-8f60-4c32-b4eb-e91b9d65f59f
Suckall, Natalie
6403cd8a-dab8-4fed-9136-ab293700d4fe
Nicholls, Robert
4ce1e355-cc5d-4702-8124-820932c57076
White, Kathleen
f20003fc-a607-4b30-8c14-867d57834b84
Lumbroso, Darren
26c7f97c-8f60-4c32-b4eb-e91b9d65f59f
Suckall, Natalie
6403cd8a-dab8-4fed-9136-ab293700d4fe
Nicholls, Robert
4ce1e355-cc5d-4702-8124-820932c57076
White, Kathleen
f20003fc-a607-4b30-8c14-867d57834b84

Lumbroso, Darren, Suckall, Natalie, Nicholls, Robert and White, Kathleen (2017) Enhancing resilience to coastal flooding from severe storms in the USA: international lessons. Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences, 17, 1357–1373. (doi:10.5194/nhess-17-1357-2017).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Recent events in the USA have highlighted a lack of resilience in the coastal population to coastal flooding, especially amongst disadvantaged and isolated communities. Some low-income countries, such as Cuba and Bangladesh, have made significant progress towards transformed societies that are more resilient to the impacts of cyclones and coastal flooding. To understand how this has come about, a systematic review of the peer-reviewed and grey literature related to resilience of communities to coastal flooding was undertaken in both countries. In both Cuba and Bangladesh the trust between national and local authorities, community leaders and civil society is high. As a consequence evacuation warnings are generally followed and communities are well prepared.
As a result over the past 25 years in Bangladesh the number of deaths directly related to cyclones and coastal flooding has decreased, despite an increase of almost 50% in the number of people exposed to these hazards. In Cuba, over the course of eight hurricanes between 2003 and 2011, the normalized number of deaths related to cyclones and coastal floods was an order of magnitude less than in the USA. In low-income countries, warning systems and effective shelter/ evacuation systems, combined with high levels of disaster risk-reduction education and social cohesion, coupled with trust between government authorities and vulnerable communities can help to increase resilience to coastal hazards and tropical cyclones. In the USA, transferable lessons include improving communication and the awareness of the risks posed by coastal surges, mainstreaming disaster risk reduction into the education system and building trusted community networks to help isolated and disadvantaged communities, and improve community resilience

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Lumbroso et al (2017) - Version of Record
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 9 June 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 9 August 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 414935
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/414935
ISSN: 1561-8633
PURE UUID: 1adc9d08-f1ec-4f49-a70a-a2fb9428ce82
ORCID for Robert Nicholls: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9715-1109

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 17 Oct 2017 16:30
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:02

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