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Flow electrolysis cells for the synthetic organic chemistry laboratory

Flow electrolysis cells for the synthetic organic chemistry laboratory
Flow electrolysis cells for the synthetic organic chemistry laboratory
Electrosynthesis has much to offer to the synthetic organic chemist. But in order to be widely accepted as a routine procedure in an organic synthesis laboratory, electrosynthesis needs to be presented in a much more user-friendly way. The literature is largely based on electrolysis in a glass beaker or H-cells that often give poor performance for synthesis with a very slow rate of conversion and, often, low selectivity and reproducibility. Flow cells can lead to much improved performance. Electrolysis is participating in the trend toward continuous flow synthesis, and this has led to a number of innovations in flow cell design that make possible selective syntheses with high conversion of reactant to product with a single passage of the reactant solution through the cell. In addition, the needs of the synthetic organic chemist can often be met by flow cells operating with recycle of the reactant solution. These cells give a high rate of product formation while the reactant concentration is high, but they perform best at low conversion. Both approaches are considered in this review and the important features of each cell design are discussed. Throughout, the application of the cell designs is illustrated with syntheses that have been reported.
electrochemistry, technology, Synthesis, Energy, materials
0009-2665
Pletcher, Derek
f22ebe69-b859-4a89-80b0-9e190e6f8f30
Green, Robert A.
756bfedb-659e-469e-910d-1bcb63301cc3
Brown, Richard C.D.
21ce697a-7c3a-480e-919f-429a3d8550f5
Pletcher, Derek
f22ebe69-b859-4a89-80b0-9e190e6f8f30
Green, Robert A.
756bfedb-659e-469e-910d-1bcb63301cc3
Brown, Richard C.D.
21ce697a-7c3a-480e-919f-429a3d8550f5

Pletcher, Derek, Green, Robert A. and Brown, Richard C.D. (2017) Flow electrolysis cells for the synthetic organic chemistry laboratory. Chemical Reviews. (doi:10.1021/acs.chemrev.7b00360).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Electrosynthesis has much to offer to the synthetic organic chemist. But in order to be widely accepted as a routine procedure in an organic synthesis laboratory, electrosynthesis needs to be presented in a much more user-friendly way. The literature is largely based on electrolysis in a glass beaker or H-cells that often give poor performance for synthesis with a very slow rate of conversion and, often, low selectivity and reproducibility. Flow cells can lead to much improved performance. Electrolysis is participating in the trend toward continuous flow synthesis, and this has led to a number of innovations in flow cell design that make possible selective syntheses with high conversion of reactant to product with a single passage of the reactant solution through the cell. In addition, the needs of the synthetic organic chemist can often be met by flow cells operating with recycle of the reactant solution. These cells give a high rate of product formation while the reactant concentration is high, but they perform best at low conversion. Both approaches are considered in this review and the important features of each cell design are discussed. Throughout, the application of the cell designs is illustrated with syntheses that have been reported.

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Chem Rev 2017 - Version of Record
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Accepted/In Press date: 30 August 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 18 September 2017
Keywords: electrochemistry, technology, Synthesis, Energy, materials

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 414987
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/414987
ISSN: 0009-2665
PURE UUID: b5219ff2-2e4b-4dc5-b851-3ed5c2a98a12
ORCID for Richard C.D. Brown: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0156-7087

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Date deposited: 19 Oct 2017 16:31
Last modified: 15 Sep 2021 01:40

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Author: Derek Pletcher
Author: Robert A. Green

University divisions

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