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Moving on and moving out: The implications of socio-spatial mobility for union stability

Moving on and moving out: The implications of socio-spatial mobility for union stability
Moving on and moving out: The implications of socio-spatial mobility for union stability
The term ‘leading migrant’ was traditionally used to describe a male migrant within a couple, and terms such as ‘trailing spouse’ or ‘tied migrant’ were often used to describe their female partners. With the dramatic restructuring of the economy, increased female participation in the labour market and the rise of dual-earner couples, either partner may now be the ‘leading migrant’. It is therefore plausible that the effects of family migration may also have altered. In this paper, we ask whether family migration for contemporary dual-earner couples has negative consequences for the stability of their partnership. In particular, we investigate whether any negative changes in partners’ employment characteristics following family migration are associated with higher risks of union dissolution. We construct a specialized dataset from the British Household Panel Survey (BHPS) to examine migration, employment and union dissolution in Britain. The BHPS is especially well suited to our study because it provides recent, nationally representative data and a wide range of potentially important prospective and retrospective information on households and individuals. We undertake a duration analysis of union dissolution.
Union dissolution is largely explained by partners’ socio-demographic characteristics, the characteristics of the union, the presence and age of children, and the labour force characteristics of both partners. However, spatial mobility, and especially frequent migration, is associated with an increase in the risk of union dissolution, especially within five years of a migration event. Short-distance migration is associated with greater union stability while long distance migration increases the risk of union dissolution. Adverse changes in employment for both partners, but especially the male partner, are negatively related to union stability. We did not find any convincing evidence that migration exacerbates the negative effect that changes in employment characteristics have on union stability.

Spatial mobility , union stability , socio-economic mobility, family life, longitudinal analyses, BHPS
University of Southampton
Shapira, Marina
6eec8b80-6aef-40ae-a291-580a14950498
Gayle, Vernon
6f166435-39d9-43a2-babd-f5daaf6ae898
Graham, Elspeth
44e94ad4-8fbe-485e-9353-6a83af3c33f7
Mcgowan, Teresa
4524e894-04de-4822-8508-f4b966e12ae2
Shapira, Marina
6eec8b80-6aef-40ae-a291-580a14950498
Gayle, Vernon
6f166435-39d9-43a2-babd-f5daaf6ae898
Graham, Elspeth
44e94ad4-8fbe-485e-9353-6a83af3c33f7
Mcgowan, Teresa
4524e894-04de-4822-8508-f4b966e12ae2

Shapira, Marina, Gayle, Vernon and Graham, Elspeth , Mcgowan, Teresa (ed.) (2017) Moving on and moving out: The implications of socio-spatial mobility for union stability (ESRC Centre for Population Change Working Paper Series, 87) Southampton. University of Southampton 40pp.

Record type: Monograph (Working Paper)

Abstract

The term ‘leading migrant’ was traditionally used to describe a male migrant within a couple, and terms such as ‘trailing spouse’ or ‘tied migrant’ were often used to describe their female partners. With the dramatic restructuring of the economy, increased female participation in the labour market and the rise of dual-earner couples, either partner may now be the ‘leading migrant’. It is therefore plausible that the effects of family migration may also have altered. In this paper, we ask whether family migration for contemporary dual-earner couples has negative consequences for the stability of their partnership. In particular, we investigate whether any negative changes in partners’ employment characteristics following family migration are associated with higher risks of union dissolution. We construct a specialized dataset from the British Household Panel Survey (BHPS) to examine migration, employment and union dissolution in Britain. The BHPS is especially well suited to our study because it provides recent, nationally representative data and a wide range of potentially important prospective and retrospective information on households and individuals. We undertake a duration analysis of union dissolution.
Union dissolution is largely explained by partners’ socio-demographic characteristics, the characteristics of the union, the presence and age of children, and the labour force characteristics of both partners. However, spatial mobility, and especially frequent migration, is associated with an increase in the risk of union dissolution, especially within five years of a migration event. Short-distance migration is associated with greater union stability while long distance migration increases the risk of union dissolution. Adverse changes in employment for both partners, but especially the male partner, are negatively related to union stability. We did not find any convincing evidence that migration exacerbates the negative effect that changes in employment characteristics have on union stability.

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More information

Published date: 26 October 2017
Keywords: Spatial mobility , union stability , socio-economic mobility, family life, longitudinal analyses, BHPS

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 415101
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/415101
PURE UUID: 4291f8fe-47c2-4c18-8c46-ba98269444c8

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Date deposited: 27 Oct 2017 16:30
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 19:18

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