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Students’ argumentation as they communicate about controversial agricultural issues

Students’ argumentation as they communicate about controversial agricultural issues
Students’ argumentation as they communicate about controversial agricultural issues
The aim of this study was to investigate how a pedagogical approach designed to promote productive discourse and undistorted communication (Habermas, 1984) can enable secondary school students to communicate about socioscientific issues (SSIs). A small-scale qualitative study design was employed to explore how a group of 13 Biology school students communicated about the badger – cattle controversy in the UK and the types of knowledge they use in this process. A pedagogical approach based on mapping controversies in combination with asynchronous online communication was designed and implemented across 3 lessons in order to facilitate the communication process amongst the students. The approach followed three stages: (a) familiarisation stage where mapping controversies was used as a tool for students to explore their knowledge, ideas and positioning in relation to the SSI, (b) exploration stage where students engaged in an asynchronous online exchange (blog) to discuss the issue and identify solutions, and (c) consolidation stage, where mapping controversies was again utilised, as a way to establish student knowledge and understanding. Our findings suggest that the approach was effective. The maps during the consolidation phase were conceptually different, showing that students had a more developed understanding of the complexity of the SSI. The themes found during the consolidation phase where extensively discussed during the exploration phrase. Students’ exploration of the issue during the online exchange allowed them to elaborate on their views and thinking, to question each other, and to draw on a range of knowledge types in their attempt to decide what should be done about the controversy. Implications for classroom practice and teacher education are discussed.
Socioscientific issues , Secondary science, Argumentation
Rietdijk, Willeke
0edd8cf8-a325-43d0-9b08-2268c9e7b7f4
Christodoulou, Antri
0a97820c-7e87-45d6-827a-d72fa1734d0a
Garthwaite, Kathryn
53dabbb7-cc01-4aea-b8a2-f6331501df51
Simonneaux, Laurence
6108d212-a3e2-423d-a4c3-d633d205fbcc
Rietdijk, Willeke
0edd8cf8-a325-43d0-9b08-2268c9e7b7f4
Christodoulou, Antri
0a97820c-7e87-45d6-827a-d72fa1734d0a
Garthwaite, Kathryn
53dabbb7-cc01-4aea-b8a2-f6331501df51
Simonneaux, Laurence
6108d212-a3e2-423d-a4c3-d633d205fbcc

Rietdijk, Willeke, Christodoulou, Antri, Garthwaite, Kathryn and Simonneaux, Laurence (2017) Students’ argumentation as they communicate about controversial agricultural issues. European Science Education Research Association 2017, Dublin City University, Dublin, Ireland. 21 - 25 Aug 2017.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate how a pedagogical approach designed to promote productive discourse and undistorted communication (Habermas, 1984) can enable secondary school students to communicate about socioscientific issues (SSIs). A small-scale qualitative study design was employed to explore how a group of 13 Biology school students communicated about the badger – cattle controversy in the UK and the types of knowledge they use in this process. A pedagogical approach based on mapping controversies in combination with asynchronous online communication was designed and implemented across 3 lessons in order to facilitate the communication process amongst the students. The approach followed three stages: (a) familiarisation stage where mapping controversies was used as a tool for students to explore their knowledge, ideas and positioning in relation to the SSI, (b) exploration stage where students engaged in an asynchronous online exchange (blog) to discuss the issue and identify solutions, and (c) consolidation stage, where mapping controversies was again utilised, as a way to establish student knowledge and understanding. Our findings suggest that the approach was effective. The maps during the consolidation phase were conceptually different, showing that students had a more developed understanding of the complexity of the SSI. The themes found during the consolidation phase where extensively discussed during the exploration phrase. Students’ exploration of the issue during the online exchange allowed them to elaborate on their views and thinking, to question each other, and to draw on a range of knowledge types in their attempt to decide what should be done about the controversy. Implications for classroom practice and teacher education are discussed.

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CASSIS student argumentation in blogs ESERA2017 - Version of Record
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More information

Published date: August 2017
Venue - Dates: European Science Education Research Association 2017, Dublin City University, Dublin, Ireland, 2017-08-21 - 2017-08-25
Keywords: Socioscientific issues , Secondary science, Argumentation

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 415104
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/415104
PURE UUID: 4628f21e-38db-4d74-9c04-54fe1ba5080f
ORCID for Antri Christodoulou: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7021-4210

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 27 Oct 2017 16:30
Last modified: 22 Nov 2021 03:01

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Contributors

Author: Willeke Rietdijk
Author: Kathryn Garthwaite
Author: Laurence Simonneaux

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