The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Inclusive teaching and learning: what's next?

Inclusive teaching and learning: what's next?
Inclusive teaching and learning: what's next?
This paper reflects the ‘Inclusive Teaching and Learning in Higher Education as a route to Excellence’ published by the Disabled Students Sector Leadership Group’s (DSSLG) in January 2017 and highlights actions that may be required to attain the goals set out in the report. Here we link Universal Design for Learning (UDL) principles with the Social Model of Disability and highlight how successful inclusive teaching and learning practice supports all students. The main findings that will require further consideration are:
* Successful inclusive teaching and learning practices involve planning, design, delivery and evaluation of curricula outcomes as part of a UDL agenda.
* It is essential to have sector wide agreement about the minimum expectations for inclusive teaching and learning practices that adhere to the Equality Act 2010.
* Strategic leadership is recognised as essential, but without collaboration with students including those with disabilities, results may not represent the needs of all stakeholders.
* Outcomes must be open to public inspection in particular those that involve
maintenance and measurement of quality over time.
* Training and support to embed inclusion is vital to assist faculty, researchers, teaching support staff and other service providers.
* Being flexible, equitable and proactive in the provision of multiple means of curricula presentation and assessment modes. This includes making ‘reasonable adjustments’ and allowing for personalisation to support a diverse student population.
* Effective implementation and training in use of technologies is required to enhance productivity and enable inclusion. This includes tools for planning and organisation, note taking, reading and writing support.
* The need for clear pathways for student communication with named personnel to ensure the success of anticipatory actions and the requirements for reasonable adjustments.
* The sharing of expertise to support research into evidence of good practice.
2398-5976
Draffan, E.A.
021d4f4e-d269-4379-ba5a-7e2ffb73d2bf
James, Abi
861b6a52-1b90-42ca-8aa8-632ca2784079
Martin, Nicola
24d9a2ac-4e5f-4474-9f9e-48a2661157ac
Draffan, E.A.
021d4f4e-d269-4379-ba5a-7e2ffb73d2bf
James, Abi
861b6a52-1b90-42ca-8aa8-632ca2784079
Martin, Nicola
24d9a2ac-4e5f-4474-9f9e-48a2661157ac

Draffan, E.A., James, Abi and Martin, Nicola (2017) Inclusive teaching and learning: what's next? The Journal of Inclusive Practice in Further and Higher Education, 9 (1).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This paper reflects the ‘Inclusive Teaching and Learning in Higher Education as a route to Excellence’ published by the Disabled Students Sector Leadership Group’s (DSSLG) in January 2017 and highlights actions that may be required to attain the goals set out in the report. Here we link Universal Design for Learning (UDL) principles with the Social Model of Disability and highlight how successful inclusive teaching and learning practice supports all students. The main findings that will require further consideration are:
* Successful inclusive teaching and learning practices involve planning, design, delivery and evaluation of curricula outcomes as part of a UDL agenda.
* It is essential to have sector wide agreement about the minimum expectations for inclusive teaching and learning practices that adhere to the Equality Act 2010.
* Strategic leadership is recognised as essential, but without collaboration with students including those with disabilities, results may not represent the needs of all stakeholders.
* Outcomes must be open to public inspection in particular those that involve
maintenance and measurement of quality over time.
* Training and support to embed inclusion is vital to assist faculty, researchers, teaching support staff and other service providers.
* Being flexible, equitable and proactive in the provision of multiple means of curricula presentation and assessment modes. This includes making ‘reasonable adjustments’ and allowing for personalisation to support a diverse student population.
* Effective implementation and training in use of technologies is required to enhance productivity and enable inclusion. This includes tools for planning and organisation, note taking, reading and writing support.
* The need for clear pathways for student communication with named personnel to ensure the success of anticipatory actions and the requirements for reasonable adjustments.
* The sharing of expertise to support research into evidence of good practice.

Text Inclusive Teaching and Learning in Higher Education whats next Final - Accepted Manuscript
Download (641kB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 16 October 2017
Published date: 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 415140
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/415140
ISSN: 2398-5976
PURE UUID: a32bec31-867b-48c5-a43b-024a26754458

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 01 Nov 2017 17:30
Last modified: 23 May 2018 16:32

Export record

Contributors

Author: E.A. Draffan
Author: Abi James
Author: Nicola Martin

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×