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The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay for biomaterial testing in tissue engineering: a short term in vivo preclinical model

The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay for biomaterial testing in tissue engineering: a short term in vivo preclinical model
The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay for biomaterial testing in tissue engineering: a short term in vivo preclinical model
The fields of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering offer significant promise to address the urgent unmet need for therapeutic strategies in a number of debilitating conditions, diseases, and tissue needs of an aging population. Critically, the safety and efficacy of these pioneering strategies need to be assessed before clinical application, often necessitating animal research as a prerequisite. The growing number of newly developed potential treatments, together with the ethical concerns involved in the application of in vivo studies, requires the implementation of alternative models to facilitate such screening of new treatments. The present review examines the current in vitro and in vivo models of preclinical research with particular emphasis on the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay as a minimally invasive, short-term in vivo alternative. Traditionally used as an angiogenic assay, the CAM of the developing chick embryo provides a noninnervated rapidly growing vascular bed, which can serve as a surrogate blood supply for organ culture, and hence a platform for biomaterial testing. This review offers an overview of the CAM assay and its applications in biomedicine as an in vivo model for organ culture and angiogenesis. Moreover, the application of imaging techniques (magnetic resonance imaging, microcomputed tomography, fluorescence labeling for tracking) will be discussed for the evaluation of biomaterials cultured on the CAM. Finally, an overview of the CAM assay methodology will be provided to facilitate the adoption of this technique across laboratories and the regenerative medicine community, and thus aid the reduction, replacement, and refinement of animal experiments in research.
1937-3384
938-952
Oreffo, Richard
ff9fff72-6855-4d0f-bfb2-311d0e8f3778
Moreno, Ines
4dbe5fd4-8b2b-48c6-8c48-4833fd7d7d50
Kanczler, Janos
eb8db9ff-a038-475f-9030-48eef2b0559c
Hulsart Billstrom, Signe Gry
41799212-48c4-4791-9a24-9090a77ba6cc
Inglis, Stefanie
5cf406da-ae43-41c0-9088-cb812574f0bd
Oreffo, Richard
ff9fff72-6855-4d0f-bfb2-311d0e8f3778
Moreno, Ines
4dbe5fd4-8b2b-48c6-8c48-4833fd7d7d50
Kanczler, Janos
eb8db9ff-a038-475f-9030-48eef2b0559c
Hulsart Billstrom, Signe Gry
41799212-48c4-4791-9a24-9090a77ba6cc
Inglis, Stefanie
5cf406da-ae43-41c0-9088-cb812574f0bd

Oreffo, Richard, Moreno, Ines, Kanczler, Janos, Hulsart Billstrom, Signe Gry and Inglis, Stefanie (2017) The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay for biomaterial testing in tissue engineering: a short term in vivo preclinical model. Tissue Engineering Part C Methods, 23 (12), 938-952. (doi:10.1089/ten.tec.2017.0186).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The fields of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering offer significant promise to address the urgent unmet need for therapeutic strategies in a number of debilitating conditions, diseases, and tissue needs of an aging population. Critically, the safety and efficacy of these pioneering strategies need to be assessed before clinical application, often necessitating animal research as a prerequisite. The growing number of newly developed potential treatments, together with the ethical concerns involved in the application of in vivo studies, requires the implementation of alternative models to facilitate such screening of new treatments. The present review examines the current in vitro and in vivo models of preclinical research with particular emphasis on the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay as a minimally invasive, short-term in vivo alternative. Traditionally used as an angiogenic assay, the CAM of the developing chick embryo provides a noninnervated rapidly growing vascular bed, which can serve as a surrogate blood supply for organ culture, and hence a platform for biomaterial testing. This review offers an overview of the CAM assay and its applications in biomedicine as an in vivo model for organ culture and angiogenesis. Moreover, the application of imaging techniques (magnetic resonance imaging, microcomputed tomography, fluorescence labeling for tracking) will be discussed for the evaluation of biomaterials cultured on the CAM. Finally, an overview of the CAM assay methodology will be provided to facilitate the adoption of this technique across laboratories and the regenerative medicine community, and thus aid the reduction, replacement, and refinement of animal experiments in research.

Text
The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay for biomaterial testing in tissue engineering a short term in vivo preclinical model. - Accepted Manuscript
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Submitted date: 2017
Accepted/In Press date: 31 July 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 20 October 2017
Published date: 1 December 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 415152
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/415152
ISSN: 1937-3384
PURE UUID: cb3661a4-19e8-47d5-bed8-909e70e7cfb9
ORCID for Richard Oreffo: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5995-6726
ORCID for Janos Kanczler: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7249-0414

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 01 Nov 2017 17:32
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 05:19

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