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Sailing and sailing rigs in the Ancient Mediterranean: Implications of continuity, variation and change in propulsion technology

Sailing and sailing rigs in the Ancient Mediterranean: Implications of continuity, variation and change in propulsion technology
Sailing and sailing rigs in the Ancient Mediterranean: Implications of continuity, variation and change in propulsion technology
Ships and boats form the foundations of the maritime connectivity that is a central part of our understanding of the ancient Mediterranean. While the general chronological sequence of sail and sailing-rig development is well established, the implications are less-well discussed. This article sets out how sails and sailing rigs developed in antiquity, with emphasis on the Greco-Roman world. Subsequently, instances of innovation are defined. Why specific pieces of maritime technology were, or were not, widely adopted is considered. Long-term technological continuity can be comprehended, and a shared maritime culture of sailing in the ancient Mediterranean is suggested.
Mediterranean, sailing, seafaring, square sail, spritsail, lateen
1057-2414
28-44
Whitewright, Julian
80f5f9b9-3d0d-46bb-a759-7b59f5993bb2
Whitewright, Julian
80f5f9b9-3d0d-46bb-a759-7b59f5993bb2

Whitewright, Julian (2018) Sailing and sailing rigs in the Ancient Mediterranean: Implications of continuity, variation and change in propulsion technology. International Journal of Nautical Archaeology, 47 (1), 28-44. (doi:10.1111/1095-9270.12278).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Ships and boats form the foundations of the maritime connectivity that is a central part of our understanding of the ancient Mediterranean. While the general chronological sequence of sail and sailing-rig development is well established, the implications are less-well discussed. This article sets out how sails and sailing rigs developed in antiquity, with emphasis on the Greco-Roman world. Subsequently, instances of innovation are defined. Why specific pieces of maritime technology were, or were not, widely adopted is considered. Long-term technological continuity can be comprehended, and a shared maritime culture of sailing in the ancient Mediterranean is suggested.

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Accepted/In Press date: 10 October 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 21 December 2017
Published date: March 2018
Keywords: Mediterranean, sailing, seafaring, square sail, spritsail, lateen

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 415263
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/415263
ISSN: 1057-2414
PURE UUID: 3fe0c6cc-3d11-4d74-99b7-d7f25bcd7cf7

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Date deposited: 06 Nov 2017 17:30
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 19:17

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