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Detailed molecular epidemiology of Chlamydia trachomatis in the population of Southampton attending the genitourinary medicine clinic in 2012-13 reveals the presence of long established genotypes and transitory sexual networks

Detailed molecular epidemiology of Chlamydia trachomatis in the population of Southampton attending the genitourinary medicine clinic in 2012-13 reveals the presence of long established genotypes and transitory sexual networks
Detailed molecular epidemiology of Chlamydia trachomatis in the population of Southampton attending the genitourinary medicine clinic in 2012-13 reveals the presence of long established genotypes and transitory sexual networks

Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common sexually transmitted infection (STI) in England. Our objective was to perform a detailed survey of the molecular epidemiology of C. trachomatis in the population of Southampton UK attending the genitourinary medicine clinic (GUM) to seek evidence of sexual network activity. Our hypothesis was that certain genotypes can be associated with specific demographic determinants. 380 positive samples were collected from 375 C. trachomatis positive GUM attendees out of the 3118 who consented to be part of the survey. 302 of the positive samples were fully genotyped. All six of the predominant genotypes possessed ompA locus type E. One ward of Southampton known to contain a large proportion of students had a different profile of genotypes compared to other areas of the city. Some genotypes appeared embedded in the city population whilst others appeared transient. Predominant circulating genotypes remain stable within a city population whereas others are sporadic. Sexual networks could be inferred but not conclusively identified using the data from this survey.

Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Chlamydia Infections, Chlamydia trachomatis, Cluster Analysis, England, Female, Genetic Markers, Genotype, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Molecular Epidemiology, Sequence Analysis, DNA, Young Adult, Journal Article
1932-6203
Labiran, Clare
7804e65c-6cd6-41a8-b351-abca702f6018
Rowen, David
e4c9b60b-d303-410f-9cc6-2e558046c737
Clarke, Ian Nicholas
ff6c9324-3547-4039-bb2c-10c0b3327a8b
Marsh, Peter
2f77a131-1871-45b8-a5d8-a5ea9beb430a
Labiran, Clare
7804e65c-6cd6-41a8-b351-abca702f6018
Rowen, David
e4c9b60b-d303-410f-9cc6-2e558046c737
Clarke, Ian Nicholas
ff6c9324-3547-4039-bb2c-10c0b3327a8b
Marsh, Peter
2f77a131-1871-45b8-a5d8-a5ea9beb430a

Labiran, Clare, Rowen, David, Clarke, Ian Nicholas and Marsh, Peter (2017) Detailed molecular epidemiology of Chlamydia trachomatis in the population of Southampton attending the genitourinary medicine clinic in 2012-13 reveals the presence of long established genotypes and transitory sexual networks. PLoS ONE, 12 (9). (doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0185059).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common sexually transmitted infection (STI) in England. Our objective was to perform a detailed survey of the molecular epidemiology of C. trachomatis in the population of Southampton UK attending the genitourinary medicine clinic (GUM) to seek evidence of sexual network activity. Our hypothesis was that certain genotypes can be associated with specific demographic determinants. 380 positive samples were collected from 375 C. trachomatis positive GUM attendees out of the 3118 who consented to be part of the survey. 302 of the positive samples were fully genotyped. All six of the predominant genotypes possessed ompA locus type E. One ward of Southampton known to contain a large proportion of students had a different profile of genotypes compared to other areas of the city. Some genotypes appeared embedded in the city population whilst others appeared transient. Predominant circulating genotypes remain stable within a city population whereas others are sporadic. Sexual networks could be inferred but not conclusively identified using the data from this survey.

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Accepted/In Press date: 6 September 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 25 September 2017
Keywords: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Chlamydia Infections, Chlamydia trachomatis, Cluster Analysis, England, Female, Genetic Markers, Genotype, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Molecular Epidemiology, Sequence Analysis, DNA, Young Adult, Journal Article

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 415280
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/415280
ISSN: 1932-6203
PURE UUID: b73895e7-bc13-4cd1-8bfa-5cb6662e7da0
ORCID for Ian Nicholas Clarke: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4938-1620

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Date deposited: 06 Nov 2017 17:30
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 01:29

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