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Competitive interactions moderate the effects of elevated temperature and atmospheric CO2 on the health and functioning of oysters

Competitive interactions moderate the effects of elevated temperature and atmospheric CO2 on the health and functioning of oysters
Competitive interactions moderate the effects of elevated temperature and atmospheric CO2 on the health and functioning of oysters
Global increases in sea temperatures and atmospheric concentrations of CO2 may affect the health of calcifying shellfish. Little is known, however, about how competitive interactions within and between species may influence how species respond to multiple stressors. We experimentally assessed separate and combined effects of temperature (12 or 16°C) and atmospheric CO2 concentrations (400 and 1000 ppm) on the health and biological functioning of native (Ostrea edulis) and invasive (Crassostrea gigas) oysters held alone and in intraspecific or interspecific mixtures. We found evidence of reduced phagocytosis under elevated CO2 and, when combined with increased temperature, a reduction in the number of circulating haemocytes. Generally, C. gigas showed lower respiration rates relative to O. edulis when the species were in intraspecific or interspecific mixtures. In contrast, O. edulis showed a higher respiration rate relative to C. gigas when held in an interspecific mixture and exhibited lower clearance rates when held in intraspecific or interspecific mixtures. Overall, clearance rates of C. gigas were consistently greater than those of O. edulis. Collectively, our findings indicate that a species’ ability to adapt metabolic processes to environmental conditions can be modified by biotic context and may make some species (here, C. gigas) competitively superior and less vulnerable to future climatic scenarios at local scales. If these conclusions are generic, the relative role of species interactions, and other biotic parameters, in altering the outcomes of climate change will require much greater research emphasis.
0171-8630
93-103
Green, Dannielle Senga
b1d83e27-ad7b-4bda-8a28-eb5e48f144c2
Christie, Hazel
906140ce-47de-4a58-aafb-b88212faf544
Pratt, Nicola
c94f98bd-897c-4853-bebd-be93b8aecc8a
Boots, Bas
c2ba4c26-9da8-490d-9b5d-db1286dc124a
Godbold, Jasmin A.
df6da569-e7ea-43ca-8a95-a563829fb88a
Solan, Martin
c28b294a-1db6-4677-8eab-bd8d6221fecf
Hauton, Chris
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Green, Dannielle Senga
b1d83e27-ad7b-4bda-8a28-eb5e48f144c2
Christie, Hazel
906140ce-47de-4a58-aafb-b88212faf544
Pratt, Nicola
c94f98bd-897c-4853-bebd-be93b8aecc8a
Boots, Bas
c2ba4c26-9da8-490d-9b5d-db1286dc124a
Godbold, Jasmin A.
df6da569-e7ea-43ca-8a95-a563829fb88a
Solan, Martin
c28b294a-1db6-4677-8eab-bd8d6221fecf
Hauton, Chris
7706f6ba-4497-42b2-8c6d-00df81676331

Green, Dannielle Senga, Christie, Hazel, Pratt, Nicola, Boots, Bas, Godbold, Jasmin A., Solan, Martin and Hauton, Chris (2017) Competitive interactions moderate the effects of elevated temperature and atmospheric CO2 on the health and functioning of oysters. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 582, 93-103. (doi:10.3354/meps12344).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Global increases in sea temperatures and atmospheric concentrations of CO2 may affect the health of calcifying shellfish. Little is known, however, about how competitive interactions within and between species may influence how species respond to multiple stressors. We experimentally assessed separate and combined effects of temperature (12 or 16°C) and atmospheric CO2 concentrations (400 and 1000 ppm) on the health and biological functioning of native (Ostrea edulis) and invasive (Crassostrea gigas) oysters held alone and in intraspecific or interspecific mixtures. We found evidence of reduced phagocytosis under elevated CO2 and, when combined with increased temperature, a reduction in the number of circulating haemocytes. Generally, C. gigas showed lower respiration rates relative to O. edulis when the species were in intraspecific or interspecific mixtures. In contrast, O. edulis showed a higher respiration rate relative to C. gigas when held in an interspecific mixture and exhibited lower clearance rates when held in intraspecific or interspecific mixtures. Overall, clearance rates of C. gigas were consistently greater than those of O. edulis. Collectively, our findings indicate that a species’ ability to adapt metabolic processes to environmental conditions can be modified by biotic context and may make some species (here, C. gigas) competitively superior and less vulnerable to future climatic scenarios at local scales. If these conclusions are generic, the relative role of species interactions, and other biotic parameters, in altering the outcomes of climate change will require much greater research emphasis.

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Accepted/In Press date: 18 September 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 6 November 2017
Published date: 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 415295
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/415295
ISSN: 0171-8630
PURE UUID: c4cad221-c327-41e1-9041-8d024a2ee5e0
ORCID for Jasmin A. Godbold: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5558-8188
ORCID for Martin Solan: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9924-5574
ORCID for Chris Hauton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2313-4226

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Date deposited: 07 Nov 2017 17:30
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:17

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