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An elemental approach to modelling the mechanics of the cochlea

An elemental approach to modelling the mechanics of the cochlea
An elemental approach to modelling the mechanics of the cochlea
The motion along the basilar membrane in the cochlea is due to the interaction between the micromechanical behaviour of the organ of Corti and the fluid movement in the scala. By dividing the length of the cochlea into a finite number of elements and assuming a given radial distribution of the basilar membrane motion for each element, a set of equations can be separately derived for the micromechanics and for the fluid coupling. These equations can then be combined, using matrix methods, to give the fully coupled response. This elemental approach reduces to the classical transmission line model if the micromechanics are assumed to be locally-reacting and the fluid coupling is assumed to be entirely one-dimensional, but is also valid without these assumptions. The elemental model is most easily formulated in the frequency domain, assuming quasi-linear behaviour, but a time domain formulation, using state space method, can readily incorporate local nonlinearities in the micromechanics. Examples of programs are included for the elemental model of a human cochlea that can be readily modified for other species.
0378-5955
Elliott, Stephen J.
721dc55c-8c3e-4895-b9c4-82f62abd3567
Ni, Guangjian
f6ddc112-7d81-403a-b97a-7ecbc8fd4e59
Elliott, Stephen J.
721dc55c-8c3e-4895-b9c4-82f62abd3567
Ni, Guangjian
f6ddc112-7d81-403a-b97a-7ecbc8fd4e59

Elliott, Stephen J. and Ni, Guangjian (2017) An elemental approach to modelling the mechanics of the cochlea. Hearing Research. (doi:10.1016/j.heares.2017.10.013).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The motion along the basilar membrane in the cochlea is due to the interaction between the micromechanical behaviour of the organ of Corti and the fluid movement in the scala. By dividing the length of the cochlea into a finite number of elements and assuming a given radial distribution of the basilar membrane motion for each element, a set of equations can be separately derived for the micromechanics and for the fluid coupling. These equations can then be combined, using matrix methods, to give the fully coupled response. This elemental approach reduces to the classical transmission line model if the micromechanics are assumed to be locally-reacting and the fluid coupling is assumed to be entirely one-dimensional, but is also valid without these assumptions. The elemental model is most easily formulated in the frequency domain, assuming quasi-linear behaviour, but a time domain formulation, using state space method, can readily incorporate local nonlinearities in the micromechanics. Examples of programs are included for the elemental model of a human cochlea that can be readily modified for other species.

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Elliott and Ni-2017Hearing Research-AcceptedVersion - Proof
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Accepted/In Press date: 30 October 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 1 November 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 415334
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/415334
ISSN: 0378-5955
PURE UUID: 4d86e0e6-7d1c-4a73-9c4f-960f29da9d5a
ORCID for Guangjian Ni: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9240-3020

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Date deposited: 07 Nov 2017 17:30
Last modified: 17 Dec 2019 05:48

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