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Detonation interaction with cavity in supersonic combustible mixture

Detonation interaction with cavity in supersonic combustible mixture
Detonation interaction with cavity in supersonic combustible mixture
Two-dimensional adaptive simulations of detonation are carried out in a cavity
embedded channel to investigate detonation interaction with the cavity in supersonic combustible mixtures. The reactive Euler equations with a detailed reaction model are solved using the second-order MUSCL-TVD scheme based on the open-source program AMROC. The results show that when the detonation wave propagates backward and crosses over the cavity, an oblique shock wave is first induced originated from the left edge of the cavity in the detonation front, which is demonstrated to actually be an oblique shock-induced combustion and further induces an unburned jet behind the oblique shock. As the oblique shock wave grows, the detonation wave further propagates backward with the front height gradually reduced and together the enlargement of the unburned jet. Rather than the speculated detonation failure, the detonation wave realizes relatively dynamic sustainment due to the pressure oscillation in the subsonic combustion in the cavity which can contribute significantly to the formation of highly unstable shear layers. The rapid turbulent mixing resulting from the large-scale vortices along the shear layers can enhance the consumption of the unburned jet and the subsequent chemical energy release, which plays a significant role in the detonation sustainment. A contractive passway is formed due to the highly unstable shear layers along the unburned jet resulting from hydrodynamic instabilities, which further induce the formation of overdriven detonation and its forward propagation once again. A periodical process of forward detonation propagation, detonation attenuation, detonation sustainment is formed in supersonic combustible mixtures due to detonation interaction with the cavity.
American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics
Cai, Xiaodong
293bf621-f0e1-48ba-abaa-b41da81ea244
Liang, Jianhan
fd8229b7-c7f4-4a1b-b94f-abce393f9e9a
Lin, Zhiyong
ca704069-5f56-4689-8fde-4edb13622723
Deiterding, Ralf
ce02244b-6651-47e3-8325-2c0a0c9c6314
Cai, Xiaodong
293bf621-f0e1-48ba-abaa-b41da81ea244
Liang, Jianhan
fd8229b7-c7f4-4a1b-b94f-abce393f9e9a
Lin, Zhiyong
ca704069-5f56-4689-8fde-4edb13622723
Deiterding, Ralf
ce02244b-6651-47e3-8325-2c0a0c9c6314

Cai, Xiaodong, Liang, Jianhan, Lin, Zhiyong and Deiterding, Ralf (2017) Detonation interaction with cavity in supersonic combustible mixture. In 21st AIAA International Space Planes and Hypersonics Technologies Conference. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. 11 pp . (doi:10.2514/6.2017-2428).

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Two-dimensional adaptive simulations of detonation are carried out in a cavity
embedded channel to investigate detonation interaction with the cavity in supersonic combustible mixtures. The reactive Euler equations with a detailed reaction model are solved using the second-order MUSCL-TVD scheme based on the open-source program AMROC. The results show that when the detonation wave propagates backward and crosses over the cavity, an oblique shock wave is first induced originated from the left edge of the cavity in the detonation front, which is demonstrated to actually be an oblique shock-induced combustion and further induces an unburned jet behind the oblique shock. As the oblique shock wave grows, the detonation wave further propagates backward with the front height gradually reduced and together the enlargement of the unburned jet. Rather than the speculated detonation failure, the detonation wave realizes relatively dynamic sustainment due to the pressure oscillation in the subsonic combustion in the cavity which can contribute significantly to the formation of highly unstable shear layers. The rapid turbulent mixing resulting from the large-scale vortices along the shear layers can enhance the consumption of the unburned jet and the subsequent chemical energy release, which plays a significant role in the detonation sustainment. A contractive passway is formed due to the highly unstable shear layers along the unburned jet resulting from hydrodynamic instabilities, which further induce the formation of overdriven detonation and its forward propagation once again. A periodical process of forward detonation propagation, detonation attenuation, detonation sustainment is formed in supersonic combustible mixtures due to detonation interaction with the cavity.

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e-pub ahead of print date: 2 March 2017
Published date: 9 March 2017
Venue - Dates: International Space Planes and Hypersonic Systems and Technologies Conferences: 21st AIAA International Space Planes and Hypersonics Technologies Conference, Xiamen, China, 2017-03-06 - 2017-03-09

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 415342
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/415342
PURE UUID: c6fe004f-0653-4c3e-972b-0e35c4814cf9
ORCID for Ralf Deiterding: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4776-8183

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Date deposited: 07 Nov 2017 17:30
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:32

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Contributors

Author: Xiaodong Cai
Author: Jianhan Liang
Author: Zhiyong Lin
Author: Ralf Deiterding ORCID iD

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