The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Taking the high ground: the impact of social status on the derogation of ideological opponents

Taking the high ground: the impact of social status on the derogation of ideological opponents
Taking the high ground: the impact of social status on the derogation of ideological opponents
People tend to derogate their ideological opponents. But how does social status affect this tendency? We tested a prediction derived from hierometer theory that people with higher status would derogate ideological opponents less (i.e., evaluate them more charitably). We further predicted that greater rhetoric handling prowess (RHP: feeling more confident and less intimidated while arguing) would mediate the effect. Study 1 established a link between higher status and lesser opponent derogation correlationally. Study 2 did so experimentally. Using a scale to assess RHP developed and validated in Study 3, Study 4 established that RHP statistically mediated the correlational link between status and derogation. In Study 5, experimentally manipulating status affected RHP as predicted. However, in Study 6, experimentally manipulating RHP did not affect opponent derogation as predicted. Thus, our findings were substantially, but not entirely, consistent with our theoretically-derived predictions. Implications for hierometer theory, and related theoretical approaches, are considered.
0278-016X
43-77
Gregg, Aiden
1b03bb58-b3a5-4852-a177-29e4f633b063
Mahadevan, Nikhila
6fdfa44a-a12b-447a-b6d6-be818c4f2d69
Sedikides, Constantine
9d45e66d-75bb-44de-87d7-21fd553812c2
Gregg, Aiden
1b03bb58-b3a5-4852-a177-29e4f633b063
Mahadevan, Nikhila
6fdfa44a-a12b-447a-b6d6-be818c4f2d69
Sedikides, Constantine
9d45e66d-75bb-44de-87d7-21fd553812c2

Gregg, Aiden, Mahadevan, Nikhila and Sedikides, Constantine (2018) Taking the high ground: the impact of social status on the derogation of ideological opponents. Social Cognition, 36 (1), 43-77. (doi:10.1521/soco.2018.36.1.43).

Record type: Article

Abstract

People tend to derogate their ideological opponents. But how does social status affect this tendency? We tested a prediction derived from hierometer theory that people with higher status would derogate ideological opponents less (i.e., evaluate them more charitably). We further predicted that greater rhetoric handling prowess (RHP: feeling more confident and less intimidated while arguing) would mediate the effect. Study 1 established a link between higher status and lesser opponent derogation correlationally. Study 2 did so experimentally. Using a scale to assess RHP developed and validated in Study 3, Study 4 established that RHP statistically mediated the correlational link between status and derogation. In Study 5, experimentally manipulating status affected RHP as predicted. However, in Study 6, experimentally manipulating RHP did not affect opponent derogation as predicted. Thus, our findings were substantially, but not entirely, consistent with our theoretically-derived predictions. Implications for hierometer theory, and related theoretical approaches, are considered.

Text
Gregg_Mahadevan_Sedikides_in press_Social Cognition - Accepted Manuscript
Download (576kB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 3 November 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 30 January 2018
Published date: 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 415456
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/415456
ISSN: 0278-016X
PURE UUID: eb1dbe6d-7afc-4471-83d8-304d2cf71297

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 10 Nov 2017 17:30
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 06:40

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×