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The Quaternary Rivers of the Jurassic Coast Region: from the Neogene to the Anthropocene

The Quaternary Rivers of the Jurassic Coast Region: from the Neogene to the Anthropocene
The Quaternary Rivers of the Jurassic Coast Region: from the Neogene to the Anthropocene
The Jurassic Coast World Heritage Sites (JCWHS) is not only a 95 km long coastline and remarkable Mesozoic geological section, but also a slice through a Quaternary landscape. For the majority of the last two million years this landscape lay in the periglacial zone, just south of a waxing and waning ice margin and just north of an Atlantic inlet which eventually became the English Channel. This paper reviews how the previous landscape inherited from the Cenozoic, was modified through uplift, climatically driven fluvial activity and periglaciation. Much evidence of this Quaternary history can be been today in sections along the JCWHS coast which is cuts through a number of headwater valleys the largest of which are the Exe and Axe. Recent studies, largely funded from the Aggregate Levy Tax, have produced the first independent chronologies for the Exe and Axe valleys and a model of how periglaciation interacted with the layer-cake stratigraphy of the Mesozoic bedrocks of the JCWHS. The Quaternary history of the JCWHS is also preserved in raised beaches on the Isle of Portland, coastal landforms, and in Holocene alluvial sediments associated with human activity and which may constitute part of the putative Anthropocene. An appreciation of the Quaternary history of the JCWHS is also important in understanding modern geological hazards from landslides to flooding
0016-7878
Brown, A.G.
c51f9d3e-02b0-47da-a483-41c354e78fab
Basell, L.S.
aa4d5810-d867-4c42-95c8-c54cea30b161
Toms, P.S.
323a4b9c-2e67-4dce-b0fe-f966ada75b99
Brown, A.G.
c51f9d3e-02b0-47da-a483-41c354e78fab
Basell, L.S.
aa4d5810-d867-4c42-95c8-c54cea30b161
Toms, P.S.
323a4b9c-2e67-4dce-b0fe-f966ada75b99

Brown, A.G., Basell, L.S. and Toms, P.S. (2017) The Quaternary Rivers of the Jurassic Coast Region: from the Neogene to the Anthropocene Proceedings of the Geologists' Association

Record type: Article

Abstract

The Jurassic Coast World Heritage Sites (JCWHS) is not only a 95 km long coastline and remarkable Mesozoic geological section, but also a slice through a Quaternary landscape. For the majority of the last two million years this landscape lay in the periglacial zone, just south of a waxing and waning ice margin and just north of an Atlantic inlet which eventually became the English Channel. This paper reviews how the previous landscape inherited from the Cenozoic, was modified through uplift, climatically driven fluvial activity and periglaciation. Much evidence of this Quaternary history can be been today in sections along the JCWHS coast which is cuts through a number of headwater valleys the largest of which are the Exe and Axe. Recent studies, largely funded from the Aggregate Levy Tax, have produced the first independent chronologies for the Exe and Axe valleys and a model of how periglaciation interacted with the layer-cake stratigraphy of the Mesozoic bedrocks of the JCWHS. The Quaternary history of the JCWHS is also preserved in raised beaches on the Isle of Portland, coastal landforms, and in Holocene alluvial sediments associated with human activity and which may constitute part of the putative Anthropocene. An appreciation of the Quaternary history of the JCWHS is also important in understanding modern geological hazards from landslides to flooding

Text PGA Jurassic Coast Paper Rerevised Submitted V8 with Figs - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 29 January 2019.

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 29 October 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 415463
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/415463
ISSN: 0016-7878
PURE UUID: 5ed6af20-fbd8-4db4-85df-5832482fc1ad

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Date deposited: 10 Nov 2017 17:30
Last modified: 10 Nov 2017 17:30

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Contributors

Author: A.G. Brown
Author: L.S. Basell
Author: P.S. Toms

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