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Modern day population, pathogen and pest dispersals

Modern day population, pathogen and pest dispersals
Modern day population, pathogen and pest dispersals
The anthropogenic translocation of species has been a constant occurrence throughout human history, resulting in the exchange of pathogens and pests. However, only in the last few decades has extensive and regular contact between peoples, flora and fauna from both the Old and New Worlds occurred. The recent increases in speed, reach and volume of modern transport is putting people at risk from the emergence of new strains of familiar diseases on the other side of the planet, and from completely new diseases, while rates of dispersal of both disease vectors and the diseases they carry are increasing. Moreover, this growing global connectivity is increasing the rates of invasive ‘pest’ species arrivals. This chapter describes these modern-day trends and presents case studies that illustrate the effects of growing international connectivity across spatial scales, and how novel digital datasets are increasingly available to help us understand and control some of the negative effects of these dispersals.
521-534
Cambridge University Press
Tatem, Andrew
6c6de104-a5f9-46e0-bb93-a1a7c980513e
Boivin, Nicole
Crassard, Remy
Petraglia, Michael
Tatem, Andrew
6c6de104-a5f9-46e0-bb93-a1a7c980513e
Boivin, Nicole
Crassard, Remy
Petraglia, Michael

Tatem, Andrew (2017) Modern day population, pathogen and pest dispersals. In, Boivin, Nicole, Crassard, Remy and Petraglia, Michael (eds.) Human Dispersal and Species Movement. Cambridge. Cambridge University Press, pp. 521-534. (doi:10.1017/9781316686942).

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

The anthropogenic translocation of species has been a constant occurrence throughout human history, resulting in the exchange of pathogens and pests. However, only in the last few decades has extensive and regular contact between peoples, flora and fauna from both the Old and New Worlds occurred. The recent increases in speed, reach and volume of modern transport is putting people at risk from the emergence of new strains of familiar diseases on the other side of the planet, and from completely new diseases, while rates of dispersal of both disease vectors and the diseases they carry are increasing. Moreover, this growing global connectivity is increasing the rates of invasive ‘pest’ species arrivals. This chapter describes these modern-day trends and presents case studies that illustrate the effects of growing international connectivity across spatial scales, and how novel digital datasets are increasingly available to help us understand and control some of the negative effects of these dispersals.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 31 May 2017
Published date: 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 415490
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/415490
PURE UUID: e6bea6a2-b378-4a09-994c-98d367f5a7ac
ORCID for Andrew Tatem: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7270-941X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 13 Nov 2017 17:30
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 02:01

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Contributors

Author: Andrew Tatem ORCID iD
Editor: Nicole Boivin
Editor: Remy Crassard
Editor: Michael Petraglia

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