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The blood-brain interface: a culture change

The blood-brain interface: a culture change
The blood-brain interface: a culture change
The blood-brain interface (BBI) is the subject of a new named series at Brain, Behavior, and Immunity. It is timely to reflect on a number of advances in the field within the last ten years, which may lead to an increased understanding of human behavior and a wide range of psychiatric and neurological conditions. We cover discoveries made in solute and cell trafficking, endothelial cell and pericyte biology, extracellular matrix and emerging tools, especially those which will enable study of the human BBI. We now recognize the central role of the BBI in a number of immunopsychiatric syndromes, including sickness behaviour, delirium, septic encephalopathy, cognitive side effects of cytokine-based therapies and the frank psychosis observed in neuronal surface antibody syndromes. In addition, we find ourselves interrogating and modulating the brain across the BBI, during diagnostic investigation and treatment of brain disease. The past ten years of BBI research have been exciting but there is more to come.
0889-1591
11-16
Galea, Ian
66209a2f-f7e6-4d63-afe4-e9299f156f0b
Perry, V. Hugh
8f29d36a-8e1f-4082-8700-09483bbaeae4
Galea, Ian
66209a2f-f7e6-4d63-afe4-e9299f156f0b
Perry, V. Hugh
8f29d36a-8e1f-4082-8700-09483bbaeae4

Galea, Ian and Perry, V. Hugh (2018) The blood-brain interface: a culture change. Brain, Behavior and Immunity, 68, 11-16. (doi:10.1016/j.bbi.2017.10.014).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The blood-brain interface (BBI) is the subject of a new named series at Brain, Behavior, and Immunity. It is timely to reflect on a number of advances in the field within the last ten years, which may lead to an increased understanding of human behavior and a wide range of psychiatric and neurological conditions. We cover discoveries made in solute and cell trafficking, endothelial cell and pericyte biology, extracellular matrix and emerging tools, especially those which will enable study of the human BBI. We now recognize the central role of the BBI in a number of immunopsychiatric syndromes, including sickness behaviour, delirium, septic encephalopathy, cognitive side effects of cytokine-based therapies and the frank psychosis observed in neuronal surface antibody syndromes. In addition, we find ourselves interrogating and modulating the brain across the BBI, during diagnostic investigation and treatment of brain disease. The past ten years of BBI research have been exciting but there is more to come.

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Galea Perry 2018_postprint - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 17 October 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 26 October 2017
Published date: February 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 415581
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/415581
ISSN: 0889-1591
PURE UUID: aa2cc691-9cea-4d4f-9b5e-7d1378d67a1b
ORCID for Ian Galea: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1268-5102

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Date deposited: 15 Nov 2017 17:30
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 05:45

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