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Distributional patterns of polychaetes across the Western Antarctic based on DNA barcoding and particle tracking analyses

Distributional patterns of polychaetes across the Western Antarctic based on DNA barcoding and particle tracking analyses
Distributional patterns of polychaetes across the Western Antarctic based on DNA barcoding and particle tracking analyses
Recent genetic investigations have uncovered a high proportion of cryptic species within Antarctic polychaetes. It is likely that these evolved in isolation during periods of glaciation, and it is possible that cryptic populations would have remained geographically restricted from one another occupying different regions of Antarctica. By analysing the distributions of nine morphospecies, (six of which contained potential cryptic species), we find evidence for widespread distributions within the Western Antarctic region. Around 60% of the cryptic species exhibited sympatric distributions, and at least one cryptic clade was found to be widespread. Additional DNA barcodes from GenBank and morphological records extended the observed range of three species studied here, and indicate potential circum-Antarctic traits. Particle tracking analyses was used to model theoretical dispersal ranges of pelagic larvae. Data from these models suggest that the observed species distributions inferred from genetic similarity could have been established and maintained through the regional oceanographic currents. West Antarctic continental shelf populations may be connected via the Antarctic Circumpolar Current or its coastal Counter Current, dependent on particle release location. Improved understanding of the distribution of Antarctic fauna is essential for predicting the impacts of environmental change and determining management strategies for the region.
2296-7745
Brasier, Madeleine J.
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Harle, James
b59d8925-1e59-42d4-b08f-823fec3b701e
Wiklund, Helena
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Jeffreys, Rachel M.
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Linse, Katrin
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Ruhl, Henry A.
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Glover, Adrian G.
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Brasier, Madeleine J.
0d231e03-e216-4cb0-8b70-0bf3fd398cc1
Harle, James
b59d8925-1e59-42d4-b08f-823fec3b701e
Wiklund, Helena
7c228af0-33a8-471f-b0f8-bc1e558cf8ed
Jeffreys, Rachel M.
00be4640-1d07-4f82-964a-0a61b50322c4
Linse, Katrin
74d7ddc0-74a1-4777-ac1d-3f39ae1935ad
Ruhl, Henry A.
177608ef-7793-4911-86cf-cd9960ff22b6
Glover, Adrian G.
91192a3a-fc25-4c1f-b062-2e4da183272e

Brasier, Madeleine J., Harle, James, Wiklund, Helena, Jeffreys, Rachel M., Linse, Katrin, Ruhl, Henry A. and Glover, Adrian G. (2017) Distributional patterns of polychaetes across the Western Antarctic based on DNA barcoding and particle tracking analyses. Frontiers in Marine Science, 4. (doi:10.3389/fmars.2017.00356).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Recent genetic investigations have uncovered a high proportion of cryptic species within Antarctic polychaetes. It is likely that these evolved in isolation during periods of glaciation, and it is possible that cryptic populations would have remained geographically restricted from one another occupying different regions of Antarctica. By analysing the distributions of nine morphospecies, (six of which contained potential cryptic species), we find evidence for widespread distributions within the Western Antarctic region. Around 60% of the cryptic species exhibited sympatric distributions, and at least one cryptic clade was found to be widespread. Additional DNA barcodes from GenBank and morphological records extended the observed range of three species studied here, and indicate potential circum-Antarctic traits. Particle tracking analyses was used to model theoretical dispersal ranges of pelagic larvae. Data from these models suggest that the observed species distributions inferred from genetic similarity could have been established and maintained through the regional oceanographic currents. West Antarctic continental shelf populations may be connected via the Antarctic Circumpolar Current or its coastal Counter Current, dependent on particle release location. Improved understanding of the distribution of Antarctic fauna is essential for predicting the impacts of environmental change and determining management strategies for the region.

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Accepted/In Press date: 24 October 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 16 November 2017
Published date: 16 November 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 415595
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/415595
ISSN: 2296-7745
PURE UUID: 6ad6b15a-f856-4d99-abdc-d88de4cbfe82

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Date deposited: 16 Nov 2017 17:30
Last modified: 18 Jul 2019 11:25

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Contributors

Author: Madeleine J. Brasier
Author: James Harle
Author: Helena Wiklund
Author: Rachel M. Jeffreys
Author: Katrin Linse
Author: Henry A. Ruhl
Author: Adrian G. Glover

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