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Strategies to improve recruitment of people with dementia to research studies

Strategies to improve recruitment of people with dementia to research studies
Strategies to improve recruitment of people with dementia to research studies
Background: Low participation in research is one of the key challenges to advancing understanding of dementia, and improving the care and treatment of those who live with this condition. Nurses and nurse researchers play a vital role in recruiting people with dementia to studies, as several countries including the United States and the United Kingdom set national targets and develop initiatives to encourage more people with dementia to take part in research.

Aim: To highlight the challenges to recruiting people with dementia to studies, and to identify strategies that nurses, and in particular, nurse researchers can use for overcoming them. Our focus is primarily on the role of nurses in recruiting people with dementia to dementia studies, but much of the discussion will apply to other health professionals involved in the recruitment of people with dementia to research more generally.

Discussion: Challenges discussed include a lack of awareness about research participation opportunities and a suitable study partner. We discuss how the nurses’ role is to ensure that recruitment practices are personalised and responsive to participants’ needs and situation, rather than target-driven. The notion of responsible research is used to anchor the discussion.

Conclusion: Increasing the participation of people with dementia in research is a global priority. Nurses and nurse researchers play an important role in ensuring that people who take part in research have an optimal research experience.

Implications for practice: Recruiting people with dementia to research studies is a national priority in many countries. With a greater understanding of the challenges involved and strategies that can be used to overcome them, nurses can have an effective role in the recruitment process and research experience.
1471-3012
Bartlett, Ruth
b059d54d-9431-43a8-9d1d-19d35ab57ac3
Milne, Richard
35f925c4-4f03-4c78-8099-f04ac4da7c30
Sussams, Rebecca
56638d63-3bcf-43a8-a1e1-60293bcaa9a3
Bartlett, Ruth
b059d54d-9431-43a8-9d1d-19d35ab57ac3
Milne, Richard
35f925c4-4f03-4c78-8099-f04ac4da7c30
Sussams, Rebecca
56638d63-3bcf-43a8-a1e1-60293bcaa9a3

Bartlett, Ruth, Milne, Richard and Sussams, Rebecca (2017) Strategies to improve recruitment of people with dementia to research studies. Dementia. (In Press)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: Low participation in research is one of the key challenges to advancing understanding of dementia, and improving the care and treatment of those who live with this condition. Nurses and nurse researchers play a vital role in recruiting people with dementia to studies, as several countries including the United States and the United Kingdom set national targets and develop initiatives to encourage more people with dementia to take part in research.

Aim: To highlight the challenges to recruiting people with dementia to studies, and to identify strategies that nurses, and in particular, nurse researchers can use for overcoming them. Our focus is primarily on the role of nurses in recruiting people with dementia to dementia studies, but much of the discussion will apply to other health professionals involved in the recruitment of people with dementia to research more generally.

Discussion: Challenges discussed include a lack of awareness about research participation opportunities and a suitable study partner. We discuss how the nurses’ role is to ensure that recruitment practices are personalised and responsive to participants’ needs and situation, rather than target-driven. The notion of responsible research is used to anchor the discussion.

Conclusion: Increasing the participation of people with dementia in research is a global priority. Nurses and nurse researchers play an important role in ensuring that people who take part in research have an optimal research experience.

Implications for practice: Recruiting people with dementia to research studies is a national priority in many countries. With a greater understanding of the challenges involved and strategies that can be used to overcome them, nurses can have an effective role in the recruitment process and research experience.

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Accepted/In Press date: 10 November 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 415623
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/415623
ISSN: 1471-3012
PURE UUID: 086a58d4-c640-42e4-b17b-490e8bdc483e
ORCID for Ruth Bartlett: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3412-2300

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Date deposited: 16 Nov 2017 17:30
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 05:26

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Contributors

Author: Ruth Bartlett ORCID iD
Author: Richard Milne
Author: Rebecca Sussams

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