The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Eels, beavers, and horses: Human niche construction in the European Late Upper Palaeolithic

Eels, beavers, and horses: Human niche construction in the European Late Upper Palaeolithic
Eels, beavers, and horses: Human niche construction in the European Late Upper Palaeolithic
This paper examines interactions between co-occupants of riverine niches in north-west Europe during the Late Upper Palaeolithic using both ecological and archaeological data. It is argued that consideration of both the Lateglacial record and autecology of eel, beaver and horse supports a reinterpretation of some famous but enigmatic panels of Magdalenian mobiliary art as representations of eel fishing, along with horse and beaver exploitation in disturbed riverine habitats. It is further suggested that this constitutes a humanly co-constructed niche in ecological, nutritional, and symbolic terms, which was also particularly advantageous for human well-being and social development in this time and place.
niche construction theory, Magdalenian, nutrition, mobiliary art, sedentism
0079-497X
Brown, Antony
c51f9d3e-02b0-47da-a483-41c354e78fab
Basell, Laura
7e102abc-e158-4bc2-a6ab-890baa7141bb
Farbstein, Rebecca
54cac522-b7f7-4f5f-9ac1-7d6db126e8e2
Brown, Antony
c51f9d3e-02b0-47da-a483-41c354e78fab
Basell, Laura
7e102abc-e158-4bc2-a6ab-890baa7141bb
Farbstein, Rebecca
54cac522-b7f7-4f5f-9ac1-7d6db126e8e2

Brown, Antony, Basell, Laura and Farbstein, Rebecca (2017) Eels, beavers, and horses: Human niche construction in the European Late Upper Palaeolithic. Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society. (doi:10.1017/ppr.2017.6).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This paper examines interactions between co-occupants of riverine niches in north-west Europe during the Late Upper Palaeolithic using both ecological and archaeological data. It is argued that consideration of both the Lateglacial record and autecology of eel, beaver and horse supports a reinterpretation of some famous but enigmatic panels of Magdalenian mobiliary art as representations of eel fishing, along with horse and beaver exploitation in disturbed riverine habitats. It is further suggested that this constitutes a humanly co-constructed niche in ecological, nutritional, and symbolic terms, which was also particularly advantageous for human well-being and social development in this time and place.

Text
Eels beaver horse Paper v13 Edited with Figs - Accepted Manuscript
Download (2MB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 19 July 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 4 October 2017
Published date: 9 December 2017
Keywords: niche construction theory, Magdalenian, nutrition, mobiliary art, sedentism

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 415641
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/415641
ISSN: 0079-497X
PURE UUID: 9a3f84e6-2e65-454d-b525-21035d34c2b5
ORCID for Antony Brown: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1990-4654

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 16 Nov 2017 17:32
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:41

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×