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Targeting negative thought intrusions in chronic worry: the role of mindfulness interventions and the use of experience sampling

Targeting negative thought intrusions in chronic worry: the role of mindfulness interventions and the use of experience sampling
Targeting negative thought intrusions in chronic worry: the role of mindfulness interventions and the use of experience sampling
Background: Momentary mind wandering has been associated with reduced affect when explored across a range of clinical and non-clinical populations. As a component of mind wandering worry has been identified as a transdiagnostic process. Within this study experience sampling methodology was used to test the differential effects of acceptance and attention based mindfulness exercises on worry and the frequency of thought intrusions.

Method: 75 high worriers were randomised to one of three groups (acceptance, focussed attention or progressive muscle relaxation), and practiced a 10 minute exercise regularly for 18 days. In addition to standardised measures, six times per day participants were prompted via their mobile phones to complete a short survey assessing momentary thought intrusions.

Results: All groups experienced a reduction in worry, with the acceptance exercise having a superior effect. Mind wandering occurred frequently, within 58.82% of responses and the content tended to be related to the future. Momentary future orientated unpleasant thoughts reduced over the course, similarly for each group.

Discussion: The study provides evidence that acceptance and attention-based exercises reduce the frequency of worry in self-reported high worriers.
University of Southampton
Williams, Liam Derrick
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Williams, Liam Derrick
92761a88-6705-42f4-8fb6-cfd2b6554a3a
Garner, Matthew
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Williams, Liam Derrick (2017) Targeting negative thought intrusions in chronic worry: the role of mindfulness interventions and the use of experience sampling. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis, 100pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Background: Momentary mind wandering has been associated with reduced affect when explored across a range of clinical and non-clinical populations. As a component of mind wandering worry has been identified as a transdiagnostic process. Within this study experience sampling methodology was used to test the differential effects of acceptance and attention based mindfulness exercises on worry and the frequency of thought intrusions.

Method: 75 high worriers were randomised to one of three groups (acceptance, focussed attention or progressive muscle relaxation), and practiced a 10 minute exercise regularly for 18 days. In addition to standardised measures, six times per day participants were prompted via their mobile phones to complete a short survey assessing momentary thought intrusions.

Results: All groups experienced a reduction in worry, with the acceptance exercise having a superior effect. Mind wandering occurred frequently, within 58.82% of responses and the content tended to be related to the future. Momentary future orientated unpleasant thoughts reduced over the course, similarly for each group.

Discussion: The study provides evidence that acceptance and attention-based exercises reduce the frequency of worry in self-reported high worriers.

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Targeting Negative Thought Intrusions in Chronic Worry: the Role of Mindfulness Interventions and the Use of Experience Sampling - Version of Record
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Published date: May 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 415889
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/415889
PURE UUID: 643c56d9-17ab-4ca7-a574-1d5e2153566f

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 28 Nov 2017 17:30
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 05:25

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Contributors

Author: Liam Derrick Williams
Thesis advisor: Matthew Garner

University divisions

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