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Climate change, dolphins, spaceships and antimicrobial resistance: the impact of bubble acoustics

Climate change, dolphins, spaceships and antimicrobial resistance: the impact of bubble acoustics
Climate change, dolphins, spaceships and antimicrobial resistance: the impact of bubble acoustics
Bubbles couple to sound fields to an extraordinary extent, generating and scattering sound, and changing the chemical, physical and biological environments around them when excited to pulsate by an appropriate sound field. This paper accompanies a plenary lecture, opening with the way that the sound emitted by bubbles, when they are injected into the ocean by breaking waves, helps track the >1 billion tonnes of atmospheric carbon that transfers between atmosphere and ocean annually. However, compared to carbon dioxide, atmospheric methane has at least 20 times the ability, per molecule, to generate ‘greenhouse’ warming. Worldwide there is more than twice the amount of carbon trapped in the seabed in the form of methane hydrate than the amount of carbon worldwide in all other known conventional fossil fuels. Acoustics can track the release of bubbles of seabed methane as this hydrate dissociates in response to increasing ocean temperatures, an effect cited by some as a possible climate apocalypse. Continuing the methane theme, this paper discusses the sounds of methane/ethane ‘waterfalls’ on Titan, Saturn’s largest moon, before returning to Earth’s oceans to discuss how whales and dolphins might use the interaction between sound and bubbles when hunting. This in turn suggests possibilities for radar in the search for improvised explosive devices. The paper closes with consideration of another apocalypse, discussing the role that bubbles and acoustics have in mitigating the ‘antibiotic apocalypse’, when in response to the increasing use of antimicrobials (antibiotics to combat bacterial infections; anti-virals for viral infections; anti-fungals for fungal infections; and targeted chemicals to combat parasites) the four classes of microbes all naturally evolve resistance, such that by 2050 Anti-Microbial Resistance will be killing more people than cost the world economy more than the current size of the global economy.
bubbles, acoustic, climate, Anti-Microbial Resistance
Leighton, Timothy
3e5262ce-1d7d-42eb-b013-fcc5c286bbae
Leighton, Timothy
3e5262ce-1d7d-42eb-b013-fcc5c286bbae

Leighton, Timothy (2017) Climate change, dolphins, spaceships and antimicrobial resistance: the impact of bubble acoustics. 24th International Congress on Sound and Vibration, London, United Kingdom. 23 - 27 Jul 2017. 16 pp .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Bubbles couple to sound fields to an extraordinary extent, generating and scattering sound, and changing the chemical, physical and biological environments around them when excited to pulsate by an appropriate sound field. This paper accompanies a plenary lecture, opening with the way that the sound emitted by bubbles, when they are injected into the ocean by breaking waves, helps track the >1 billion tonnes of atmospheric carbon that transfers between atmosphere and ocean annually. However, compared to carbon dioxide, atmospheric methane has at least 20 times the ability, per molecule, to generate ‘greenhouse’ warming. Worldwide there is more than twice the amount of carbon trapped in the seabed in the form of methane hydrate than the amount of carbon worldwide in all other known conventional fossil fuels. Acoustics can track the release of bubbles of seabed methane as this hydrate dissociates in response to increasing ocean temperatures, an effect cited by some as a possible climate apocalypse. Continuing the methane theme, this paper discusses the sounds of methane/ethane ‘waterfalls’ on Titan, Saturn’s largest moon, before returning to Earth’s oceans to discuss how whales and dolphins might use the interaction between sound and bubbles when hunting. This in turn suggests possibilities for radar in the search for improvised explosive devices. The paper closes with consideration of another apocalypse, discussing the role that bubbles and acoustics have in mitigating the ‘antibiotic apocalypse’, when in response to the increasing use of antimicrobials (antibiotics to combat bacterial infections; anti-virals for viral infections; anti-fungals for fungal infections; and targeted chemicals to combat parasites) the four classes of microbes all naturally evolve resistance, such that by 2050 Anti-Microbial Resistance will be killing more people than cost the world economy more than the current size of the global economy.

Text
2017 - Leighton - ISVR24 Plenary [paper 6]_20170323163527913 - Author's Original
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More information

Published date: July 2017
Venue - Dates: 24th International Congress on Sound and Vibration, London, United Kingdom, 2017-07-23 - 2017-07-27
Keywords: bubbles, acoustic, climate, Anti-Microbial Resistance

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 415948
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/415948
PURE UUID: dbc8b454-4218-436f-8104-f99ac95c84d1
ORCID for Timothy Leighton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1649-8750

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 29 Nov 2017 17:30
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:53

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