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Multicultural neoliberalism, global textiles, and the making of the indebted female entrepreneur in Monica Ali’s Brick Lane

Multicultural neoliberalism, global textiles, and the making of the indebted female entrepreneur in Monica Ali’s Brick Lane
Multicultural neoliberalism, global textiles, and the making of the indebted female entrepreneur in Monica Ali’s Brick Lane
Against the promise of happiness associated with the lures of diaspora, this chapter suggests that a consideration of the genre and form of contemporary novels such as Monica Ali’s Brick Lane can help to illuminate the ways in which late liberal discourses of multiculturalism (Povinelli 2011) are increasingly subordinated to the economic norms and values of neoliberalism. Rather than reading the narrative as a story of social mobility through transnational mobility, the chapter considers how Brick Lane inadvertently normalizes homeworking and the entrepreneurial as the horizon of freedom and assimilation for its protagonist in contemporary neoliberal British society. In so doing, it considers how the novel raises wider questions about the ways in which neoliberal discourses of self-management, personal responsibility, and the entrepreneurial cut across the gendered international division of labour between the core and the periphery.
Palgrave Macmillian
Morton, Stephen
3200c49e-fcfa-4088-9168-1d6998266ec1
Yaqin, Amina
Morey, Peter
Soliman, Asmaa
Morton, Stephen
3200c49e-fcfa-4088-9168-1d6998266ec1
Yaqin, Amina
Morey, Peter
Soliman, Asmaa

Morton, Stephen (2018) Multicultural neoliberalism, global textiles, and the making of the indebted female entrepreneur in Monica Ali’s Brick Lane. In, Yaqin, Amina, Morey, Peter and Soliman, Asmaa (eds.) Muslims, Multiculturalism, and Trust: New Directions. Basingstoke. Palgrave Macmillian. (Palgrave Politics of Identity and Citizenship Series) ,

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

Against the promise of happiness associated with the lures of diaspora, this chapter suggests that a consideration of the genre and form of contemporary novels such as Monica Ali’s Brick Lane can help to illuminate the ways in which late liberal discourses of multiculturalism (Povinelli 2011) are increasingly subordinated to the economic norms and values of neoliberalism. Rather than reading the narrative as a story of social mobility through transnational mobility, the chapter considers how Brick Lane inadvertently normalizes homeworking and the entrepreneurial as the horizon of freedom and assimilation for its protagonist in contemporary neoliberal British society. In so doing, it considers how the novel raises wider questions about the ways in which neoliberal discourses of self-management, personal responsibility, and the entrepreneurial cut across the gendered international division of labour between the core and the periphery.

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Published date: 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 415970
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/415970
PURE UUID: 4cebb7af-640e-4689-ae4f-8320d2484fe6

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Date deposited: 29 Nov 2017 17:30
Last modified: 29 Nov 2017 17:30

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Contributors

Author: Stephen Morton
Editor: Amina Yaqin
Editor: Peter Morey
Editor: Asmaa Soliman

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