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The harpsichord in twentieth-century Britain

The harpsichord in twentieth-century Britain
The harpsichord in twentieth-century Britain
This dissertation provides an overview of the history of the harpsichord in twentieth century Britain. It takes as its starting point the history of the revival harpsichord in the early part of the century, how the instrument affected both performance of historic music and the composition of modern music and the factors that contributed to its decline. Information regarding British composers, performers, and individual works has been gathered together in a database. Analysis of this database allows the consideration of how the characteristics of the revival harpsichord shaped the use of the instrument
throughout the century. More detailed case studies of the harpsichord works of three composers writing at different points in the century: Lennox Berkeley, Stephen Dodgson, and Michael Nyman are then plotted against this narrative. Conclusions will be drawn from analysis of the case studies and will consider how the harpsichord has moved away from its nostalgic associations, and how has it not.
University of Southampton
Lewis, Christopher David
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Lewis, Christopher David
5a6ceb16-a378-4c29-875b-3200d88ce0ec
Stras, Laurie
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Brooks, Laura
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Lewis, Christopher David (2017) The harpsichord in twentieth-century Britain. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis, 335pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

This dissertation provides an overview of the history of the harpsichord in twentieth century Britain. It takes as its starting point the history of the revival harpsichord in the early part of the century, how the instrument affected both performance of historic music and the composition of modern music and the factors that contributed to its decline. Information regarding British composers, performers, and individual works has been gathered together in a database. Analysis of this database allows the consideration of how the characteristics of the revival harpsichord shaped the use of the instrument
throughout the century. More detailed case studies of the harpsichord works of three composers writing at different points in the century: Lennox Berkeley, Stephen Dodgson, and Michael Nyman are then plotted against this narrative. Conclusions will be drawn from analysis of the case studies and will consider how the harpsichord has moved away from its nostalgic associations, and how has it not.

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THE HARPSICHORD IN TWENTIETH-CENTURY BRITAIN - Version of Record
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Available under License University of Southampton Thesis Licence.
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THE HARPSICHORD IN TWENTIETH-CENTURY BRITAIN (Restricted) - Other
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Available under License University of Southampton Thesis Licence.
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Published date: September 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 415998
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/415998
PURE UUID: d12bd1ed-5906-466b-aac8-9a2203f14470
ORCID for Laurie Stras: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0129-2047

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 29 Nov 2017 17:31
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:52

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Contributors

Author: Christopher David Lewis
Thesis advisor: Laurie Stras ORCID iD
Thesis advisor: Laura Brooks

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